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"My daughter is two and a half years old. When she hears the explosions, she vomits and can sometimes spend hours without talking."

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Around Shifa hospital, in schools, in neighboring homes or with family members, almost one person in ten have been displaced by the bombing in Gaza.

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MSF sent additional staff and resources into Gaza on Thursday to support Gaza City’s al Shifa hospital, but one surgeon was refused entry at the border, reportedly because of a paperwork discrepancy. During a brief lull in the bombing, 28 patients managed to reach MSF’s clinic in Gaza City, more than had been able to access the facility since Israel's current military campaign begin.

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Due to the resurgence of violence in Iraq and the ongoing fighting between armed groups and the Iraqi army, hundreds of thousands of people have fled the cities of Mosul, Fallujah and Tikrit in the past month. Most have fled to Iraqi Kurdistan, Al Tameem governorate, or other cities considered relatively safe. Some civilians, however, remain trapped amidst heavy fighting.

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Recent fighting in Amran has driven many residents from the area. In response to their growing slate of medical needs, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has, in coordination with the Executive Unit for Managing IDPs’ Camps, supported 52 families located in Al-Najah school in Sana’a. The primary support was through the distribution of hygiene kits, non-food items, and mattresses; repairing nine bathrooms; providing water; and installing lights to help improve living conditions.

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Early in the morning, a crowd of Syrian refugees, mostly women and children, stand outside the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic at the Kawargosk camp in northern Iraq, waiting to see a doctor who knows their situation all too well. Dr. Muhammed Selim is himself a refugee, someone who was forced from his home by the war in his country just as they were forced from theirs.

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MSF continues to offer reconstructive surgical care to victims of violence in Iraq's Anbar Province and from all over the country, despite the huge challenges posed by the complex security situation.

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Since April 2012, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has managed a chronic disease treatment program in Lebanon to meet the desperate needs of Syrian patients who no longer have access to treatment.

“Nearly 90 percent of our patients arrive with prior diagnoses of chronic disease—typically hypertension and diabetes,” says Dr. Wael Harb, MSF supervisory doctor in the Bekaa Valley. “The condition worsens quickly if they haven’t received treatment for weeks.”

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Three years of extremely violent war have ripped apart towns, villages, hospitals, clinics—everything that Syrians relied on for their existence.

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In the village of Salem, near Hebron, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) psychologist named Wissam meets with a woman called Um Taha for the second time. She is 48. Her husband died five years ago and she lives in Salem with her nine children.

Um Taha’s 28-year-old son was recently arrested by the Israeli army. Troops stormed the house one night, beat Um Taha and aimed a gun at her, she says. They also turned the house upside down, destroying everything they found.

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