Country/Region

In the eleven days after militants from the Islamic State (IS) group stormed the district of Sinjar in Iraq’s Ninewa governorate, a constant stream of thousands of exhausted people has been flowing into Syria. They are heading to the relative safety of the northern border between Syria and Iraq.

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In late 2013, MSF sent teams to MSF projects in Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan on the same day to record the work we are doing with Syrians, to experience the situation through the eyes of staff members trying to provide desperately needed assistance.

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Early in the morning, a crowd of Syrian refugees, mostly women and children, stand outside the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) clinic at the Kawargosk camp in northern Iraq, waiting to see a doctor who knows their situation all too well. Dr. Muhammed Selim is himself a refugee, someone who was forced from his home by the war in his country just as they were forced from theirs.

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Since April 2012, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has managed a chronic disease treatment program in Lebanon to meet the desperate needs of Syrian patients who no longer have access to treatment.

“Nearly 90 percent of our patients arrive with prior diagnoses of chronic disease—typically hypertension and diabetes,” says Dr. Wael Harb, MSF supervisory doctor in the Bekaa Valley. “The condition worsens quickly if they haven’t received treatment for weeks.”

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Three years of extremely violent war have ripped apart towns, villages, hospitals, clinics—everything that Syrians relied on for their existence.

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A week after five international staff members were taken from an MSF house in northern Syria on the evening of January 2, 2014, MSF continues to put all efforts toward securing their safe return.

Our missing colleagues are from Belgium, Denmark, Peru, Sweden and Switzerland. They were working in an MSF-run hospital to provide essential healthcare to people affected by the conflict in Syria, where the humanitarian and medical needs are overwhelming.

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A week after five international staff members were taken from a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) house in northern Syria on the evening of January 2, 2014, MSF continues to put all efforts toward securing their safe return.

Our missing colleagues are from Belgium, Denmark, Peru, Sweden, and Switzerland. They were working in an MSF-run hospital to provide essential health care to people affected by the conflict in Syria, where the humanitarian and medical needs are overwhelming.

More >

On November 13, MSF opened a mother and child hospital in northern Jordan that aims to assist Syrian refugees in the area and local communities as well.

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