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With bombs falling since July 8, the Palestinian Territory returned to a semblance of calm on August 26. The human and material damage is immense and the political and economic situation does not give cause for optimism.  

When an unlimited ceasefire between Hamas and the Israeli Defense Forces was announced, the streets of Gaza filled with jubilant crowds. For weeks, few people aside from ambulance drivers would have been on these roads, but now students were returning to classrooms, businesses were getting up and running again, and fishermen headed back to the sea.

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Life During Wartime

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Michele Beck, medical team leader with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), took advantage of the truce to go to the north of the Gaza strip, severely damaged during the war.

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"My daughter is two and a half years old. When she hears the explosions, she vomits and can sometimes spend hours without talking."

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Around Shifa hospital, in schools, in neighboring homes or with family members, almost one person in ten have been displaced by the bombing in Gaza.

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MSF team members describe their experiences in Al-Shifa hospital amidst conflict in Gaza.

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MSF sent additional staff and resources into Gaza on Thursday to support Gaza City’s al Shifa hospital, but one surgeon was refused entry at the border, reportedly because of a paperwork discrepancy. During a brief lull in the bombing, 28 patients managed to reach MSF’s clinic in Gaza City, more than had been able to access the facility since Israel's current military campaign begin.

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In the village of Salem, near Hebron, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) psychologist named Wissam meets with a woman called Um Taha for the second time. She is 48. Her husband died five years ago and she lives in Salem with her nine children.

Um Taha’s 28-year-old son was recently arrested by the Israeli army. Troops stormed the house one night, beat Um Taha and aimed a gun at her, she says. They also turned the house upside down, destroying everything they found.

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In the village of Salem, near Hebron, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) psychologist named Wissam meets with a woman called Um Taha for the second time. She is 48. Her husband died five years ago and she lives in Salem with her nine children.

Um Taha’s 28-year-old son was recently arrested by the Israeli army. Troops stormed the house one night, beat Um Taha and aimed a gun at her, she says. They also turned the house upside down, destroying everything they found.

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MSF has begun offering surgical and postoperative services at Gaza City's Al-Shifa Hospital, akin to what teams were already doing at Nasser Hospital in Khan Younis.

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