Below is a comprehensive archive of press releases from MSF USA. Use the options in the boxes below to filter results based on your preferences.

MSF, the WHO, and Myanmar’s Ministry of Health will host a symposium exploring new ways to accelerate access to treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) throughout the country.

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Government-imposed restrictions on Muslim communities in Rakhine State are preventing tens of thousands of people from accessing health care and other basic services

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Eight months after deadly communal clashes broke out in Myanmar's Rakhine state, tens of thousands of people are still unable to access urgently needed medical care.

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MSF teams in Rakhine State are unable to provide care to many people in need due to ongoing ethnic tensions and threats against MSF staff.

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Violence and deep communal divisions in Rakhine State are preventing people from receiving emergency medical treatment.

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A new MSF report warns that cancellation of global fund grants will have devastating effect in Myanmar.

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More than two weeks after Cyclone Giri struck Myanmar, the emergency response is insufficient to meet people's needs.

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Bangkok/New York, February 18, 2010 -- A violent crackdown against stateless Rohingya in Bangladesh is forcing thousands of people to flee in fear.

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Kutupalong, Bangladesh, June 18, 2009—Thousands of unregistered Rohingya refugees living in the Kutupalong makeshift camp, Bangladesh, are being forcibly displaced from their homes, in an act of intimidation and abuse by the local authorities.

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Geneva, Amsterdam, Yangon, November 25, 2008—Thousands of people are needlessly dying due to a severe lack of lifesaving HIV/AIDS treatment in Myanmar, said the international medical humanitarian organization MSF in a report released today. Unable to continue shouldering the primary responsibility for responding to one of Asia’s worst HIV crises, MSF insists that the government of Myanmar and international organizations urgently and rapidly scale-up the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART).

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