April 03, 2017

Antibiotic resistance is happening everywhere its been looked for, including in the places where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works. Unlike in wealthier countries, the health systems in these contexts usually don't have the resources to invest in surveillance and prevention efforts.

October 14, 2014

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treats wounded patients from Iraq, Syria, and Yemen in its hospital in Amman, Jordan. Since the project began eight years ago, doctors have been treating people suffering from infections that are resistant to one or several antibiotics. Today, half of all patients arriving at the hospital already have multi-drug resistant bacteria, and it is posing a serious threat to public health in the region.

June 24, 2014

The World Health Organization published a report on resistance to antibiotics at the end of April. The first of its kind, it sounded the alarm on this insufficiently documented issue where infected wounds won't heal despite treatment. Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) had already observed the phenomena, notably in its surgical program in Amman, Jordan where, three quarters of patients from Iraq have infections due to resistant bacteria.