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Sierra Leone has been hit the hardest with over 450 confirmed cases of Ebola at the beginning of August. In Kailahun, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is running a 64 bed treatment center. Despite the lack of a cure for the virus, doctors are able to treat the symptoms of the disease: diarrhea, vomiting, and high fever. A psychologist is also working with patients and their families.

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The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more than 670 people and spread to four countries. Among those now infected are two American aid workers and the lead Ebola doctor in Sierra Leone. Gwen Ifill interviews Dr. Estrella Lasry of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) about factors, including fear and hostility, that are hindering efforts to stop the outbreak.

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Sasobas Temé Sadnou is a survivor of the deadly Ebola disease outbreak in West Africa. He was treated by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and has recovered, but many do not. Here he speaks about his experience.

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Chemoprevention is a new prevention strategy for malaria that helps to reduce the number of children becoming ill during the July-to-October peak period.

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MSF teams are facing an unprecedented phenomenon with an outbreak of Ebola now hitting several areas from the southeast of the country to capital city Conakry.

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The fight against HIV/AIDS has been hailed as one of the most successful public health projects in human history, but Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) medical teams that support HIV treatment for more than 280,000 people in 21 countries, see the revolution as unfulfilled for millions of people excluded from treatment. The See What We See films reveal what MSF medical staff witness and also highlight proven strategies for community-based care that puts more people on treatment earlier and helps them adhere to treatment in the long-term. Go to See.MSF.org to learn more.

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To fight the double threat of malnutrition and malaria in Niger, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works at the community level, providing home care with so-called "malaria agents," people from the villages trained to diagnose and treat simple malaria.

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In Mali, one in five children don't live to see their fifth birthday. Acute malnutrition affects around 10 percent of children under the age of five. Malaria is still the leading cause of child mortality in the country, with pneumonia a close second. However, there are now straightforward measures for preventing and treating these diseases. In Konseguela, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is running a pediatric program in partnership with the Ministry of Health. This project incorporates prevention into a comprehensive health care program targeting the main causes of child mortality.

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Malian refugees began arriving in Mauritania in February 2012; today, almost 70,000 people are living in Mbera camp alone. There, they are far from the conflict, but living conditions are difficult and many children are becoming malnourished. Though the camp is far from the conflict, living conditions here are precarious. Since the start of the year, the number of malnourished children has more than doubled. Close to 170,000 refugees now live in the countries bordering Mali. They hear the stories of the continuing violence back in Mali. They will not return home any time soon.

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