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August 14, 2013

In August 2013, MSF is closing all of its programs in Somalia. This decision comes after a long series of threats, kidnappings, extremely violent attacks on staff, and murders.

July 29, 2013

Francoise Duroch of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) describes how conflict and violence disrupt health care and how medical workers find themselves the direct targets of violence. She talks about how the stigma attached to sexual violence prevents victims seeking support. Finally, she explains how MSF is sometimes forced to suspend its activities and the conditions under which the organization will go public about a situation. Originally posted on CICR.org.

July 23, 2013

Syrian doctor Jamal describes working with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in a converted school that now serves as an outpatient clinic. As the conflict in Syria wears on and people are forced to live in increasingly difficult conditions. Without adequate access to health care, health problems like diabetes, hypertension, and mental health conditions have increased exponentially.

July 23, 2013

Surgeon Steve Rubin from the U.S. describes his work in one of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospitals in northern Syria. Before the war began, Syrians had access to good quality health care. Now that the country's health system has collapsed, MSF is one of very few remaining actors offering health care for chronic conditions and obstetrics in addition to care for war casualties.

July 10, 2013

A new drug for the neglected disease sleeping sickness is currently in clinical trials; if the trials are conclusive, Fexinidazole could be registered within two years and sleeping sickness could be eradicated around 2020. This drug would be a vast improvement over current treatment as it's much simpler to administer and thus accessible to many more people. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and other partner organizations established Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) in 2003 to develop new treatments for neglected diseases, including sleeping sickness.

July 10, 2013

Tuberculosis (TB) is more prevalent in Buenaventura, one of Columbia's biggest port cities, than anywhere else in the country. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working there because many people in urgent need of TB treatment have difficulty accessing the healthcare system. More than 300 TB and drug-resistant TB patients were admitted to the program in 2012.

July 09, 2013

A coup d'état in March in Central African Republic resulted in mass displacement; homes were burned and clinics looted. Some 11,000 HIV patients were cut off from antiretroviral treatment, leaving them at risk of developing resistance to medication, or worse, getting sick and dying. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has resumed medical activities and is trying to get as many people back on treatment as possible.

July 09, 2013

A coup d'état in March drives all existing health workers out of Benzambe village; clinics are looted, and the community is left with no health care during malaria season. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works to test and treat everyone in this remote part of Central African Republic.

June 21, 2013

When Jawaher fled the bombing in her native Sudan and crossed the border into South Sudan, she only took three of her children and the clothes on their backs. She was forced to leave her eldest child and embark on a month-long journey to a refugee camp where she and the other children would be safe. She is now being trained as a midwife assistant by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), but she really wants to go home.

June 21, 2013

Peter has grown up as a refugee—he first fled Sudan for Ethiopia when he was a child. Today, he lives in a refugee camp in South Sudan where he works for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a translator. He does not believe his dreams will ever be realized, but he has hope for the next generation.

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