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December 16, 2012

Hurricane Sandy hit Haiti in late October, bringing with it a rise in cholera cases. Even though the Ministry of Health's response to cholera remains inadequate, many aid organizations are leaving the country. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs five cholera treatment centers to respond to the epidemic and teams have increased the number of beds in order to deal with the influx of patients. At the treatment centers, patients receive oral or intravenous rehydration and the most severe cases receive antibiotics.

December 16, 2012

After years of conflict, a large number of tuberculosis (TB) cases are now being diagnosed in Chechnya. Half are drug-resistant cases. To help ensure that patients adhere to treatment, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has set up a counseling program which is an integral part of the treatment.

December 16, 2012

Reports on treating TB in Chechnya, fighting Yaws in Congo, working with displaced civilians in DRC and South Sudan, and battling cholera in Haiti in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

December 16, 2012

In South Sudan's Jonglei State, civilians are caught up in inter-communal clashes. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has published a report which describes the devastating consequences of the fighting on the health of displaced people.

December 16, 2012

For over two months, on foot, by car, and in dug-out canoes, three Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams scoured the tropical forest of the Republic of Congo to reach the Aka Pygmies, a marginalized people with no access to health care. 

December 16, 2012

The M23 rebels' advance on Goma left hundreds of casualties and hundreds of thousands of displaced people in its wake.  In addition to its activities in several large hospitals, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has set up mobile clinics inside the camp and continues consultations at the health center.

December 12, 2012

Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), VII Photo, and UNION HZ present FATAL NEGLECT, a six-part documentary film project, that tells the stories of millions of patients left behind by the global health revolution. In Fatal Neglect: The Global Health Revolution’s Forgotten Patients, VII photographers Seamus Murphy, Venetia Dearden, Ron Haviv, and John Stanmeyer document the impact of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, the three deadliest neglected tropical diseases—(visceral leishmaniasis (kala azar), Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), and Chagas—and vaccine-preventable diseases. The award-winning photojournalists traveled to Mali, Paraguay, South Sudan, and Tajikistan to capture the stories of frontline health workers trying to fight diseases that affect millions of people and kill hundreds of thousands each year yet garner little attention from drug developers, policy makers, or the mass media.

November 12, 2012

For the first time, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is employing seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) in Chad and Mali. 170,000 children aged between three months and five years received anti-malaria medicines during the peak transmission season. This treatment, recommended by the World Health Organization, will not eradicate malaria definitively. But in countries like Chad and Mali, where malaria is the first cause of infant and child mortality, it does have an important role to play in emergency situations.

October 25, 2012

In Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is providing medical assistance to vulnerable people facing extreme violence and a lack of access to health care. Many of these patients are young people who live on the streets and suffer the most from what MSF staff call an "epidemic of violence". Photographs and voiceover by Spencer Platt.

October 12, 2012

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) heads into Congo's tropical forest to treat the Pygmy population for yaws.

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