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A camp in a lake, a flooded hospital, and huts under water. With the onset of the rainy season, the tens of thousands of South Sudanese refugees in Lietchuor, Ethiopia, are even more vulnerable. This was Lietchuor refugee camp at the end of August—a lake of half-submerged huts. Water stagnates on the flat, bare terrain, making the camp uninhabitable for the 36,000 refugees during the rainy season. The only dry area is alongside the road running through the camp.

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Doctors working in refugee camps know all too well that epidemics spread rapidly in settings like these and that more emergency immunization campaigns are needed to prevent them. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) wants to make pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), which can prevent deadly diseases, systematically available in emergency settings.

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Violence in hospitals and the destruction of medical facilities are denying medical services to many of South Sudan's most vulnerable people.

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As war rages on, 90,000 South Sudanese people have fled their country and taken refuge in camps in the Gambella region of Ethiopia.

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The MSF team was forced to suspend medical activities at the Malakal Teaching Hospital after it was attacked. When the team returned five days later, they found a horrifying scene.

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In Juba's Tomping camp, living conditions are extremely poor. The camp is overcrowded, with only 10 square meters for every person, and water and sanitation are also major problems. More than fifty people have to share the same latrine, which is above the emergency threshold standard for such a setting.
 

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In order to prevent the diseases that killed many refugees in Yida camp, South Sudan, in 2012, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has launched a water and sanitation program and begun a vaccination campaign for children. The campaign was pushed back to start now, during the logistically difficult rainy season, because MSF had to engage in lengthy negotiations to get the vaccine at an affordable price.

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When Jawaher fled the bombing in her native Sudan and crossed the border into South Sudan, she only took three of her children and the clothes on their backs. She was forced to leave her eldest child and embark on a month-long journey to a refugee camp where she and the other children would be safe. She is now being trained as a midwife assistant by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), but she really wants to go home.

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Peter has grown up as a refugee—he first fled Sudan for Ethiopia when he was a child. Today, he lives in a refugee camp in South Sudan where he works for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a translator. He does not believe his dreams will ever be realized, but he has hope for the next generation.

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At the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan, where the population has increased five-fold in the past year, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is treating growing numbers of patients and preparing for the additional hardships that will come with the approaching rainy season.

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