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Since the June 18, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), which runs a mental health program in Hebron, has scaled up its activities and is trying to receive as many patients as possible, including children in a state of shock, and people with post-traumatic stress. In the space of one month, the team has carried out over a thousand consultations.

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Violence in hospitals and the destruction of medical facilities are denying medical services to many of South Sudan's most vulnerable people.

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On January 2, five members of Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) were abducted in northern Syria and held captive by an armed group for several months. After five months they have been released.

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There are still 50,000 refugees living in M'Poko camp at Bangui airport in Central African Republic. The authorities want them to go home but this is not an option for those who sought refuge at Bangui airport five months ago.

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MSF is working in Geti, DRC, bringing medical and mental health care to people who fled fighting between the army and militias.

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Francoise Duroch of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) describes how conflict and violence disrupt health care and how medical workers find themselves the direct targets of violence. She talks about how the stigma attached to sexual violence prevents victims seeking support. Finally, she explains how MSF is sometimes forced to suspend its activities and the conditions under which the organization will go public about a situation. Originally posted on CICR.org.

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Syrian doctor Jamal describes working with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in a converted school that now serves as an outpatient clinic. As the conflict in Syria wears on and people are forced to live in increasingly difficult conditions. Without adequate access to health care, health problems like diabetes, hypertension, and mental health conditions have increased exponentially.

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Surgeon Steve Rubin from the U.S. describes his work in one of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospitals in northern Syria. Before the war began, Syrians had access to good quality health care. Now that the country's health system has collapsed, MSF is one of very few remaining actors offering health care for chronic conditions and obstetrics in addition to care for war casualties.

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When Jawaher fled the bombing in her native Sudan and crossed the border into South Sudan, she only took three of her children and the clothes on their backs. She was forced to leave her eldest child and embark on a month-long journey to a refugee camp where she and the other children would be safe. She is now being trained as a midwife assistant by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), but she really wants to go home.

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Peter has grown up as a refugee—he first fled Sudan for Ethiopia when he was a child. Today, he lives in a refugee camp in South Sudan where he works for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a translator. He does not believe his dreams will ever be realized, but he has hope for the next generation.

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