Three years of war, 190,000 dead, three million refugees. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is witness to the human suffering behind the statistics. The war leaves its mark beyond Syria, in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq, as physical and psychological wounds scar its refugees. MSF teams deliver medical services to Syrian refugees in these bordering countries. See the Reach of War: http://reachofwar.msf.org/

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Since the June 18, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), which runs a mental health program in Hebron, has scaled up its activities and is trying to receive as many patients as possible, including children in a state of shock, and people with post-traumatic stress. In the space of one month, the team has carried out over a thousand consultations.

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Since the bombing of the Gaza Strip began on July 7, civilians, unable to flee this narrow piece of land, have been the main victims. Thousands have been injured. The teams at Al-Shifa hospital were overwhelmed and an Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team arrived to provide support ten days after the start of the offensive.

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As the Israeli offensive continues in Gaza, clashes in the West Bank, on top of several weeks of raids and arrests by Israeli forces, are taking a heavy toll on the already fragile psychological well being of Palestinians. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) launched an emergency response in mid-June and has carried out 1,146 mental health consultations for those affected by the violence since then.

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Since April 2012, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has managed a chronic disease treatment program in Lebanon to meet the desperate needs of Syrian patients who no longer have access to treatment.
 
"Nearly 90 percent of our patients arrive with prior diagnoses of chronic disease—typically hypertension and diabetes," says Dr. Wael Harb, MSF supervisory doctor in the Bekaa Valley. "The condition worsens quickly if they haven't received treatment for weeks."
 
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MSF is working in Geti, DRC, bringing medical and mental health care to people who fled fighting between the army and militias.

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Syrian doctor Jamal describes working with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in a converted school that now serves as an outpatient clinic. As the conflict in Syria wears on and people are forced to live in increasingly difficult conditions. Without adequate access to health care, health problems like diabetes, hypertension, and mental health conditions have increased exponentially.

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Surgeon Steve Rubin from the U.S. describes his work in one of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospitals in northern Syria. Before the war began, Syrians had access to good quality health care. Now that the country's health system has collapsed, MSF is one of very few remaining actors offering health care for chronic conditions and obstetrics in addition to care for war casualties.

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When Jawaher fled the bombing in her native Sudan and crossed the border into South Sudan, she only took three of her children and the clothes on their backs. She was forced to leave her eldest child and embark on a month-long journey to a refugee camp where she and the other children would be safe. She is now being trained as a midwife assistant by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), but she really wants to go home.

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Peter has grown up as a refugee—he first fled Sudan for Ethiopia when he was a child. Today, he lives in a refugee camp in South Sudan where he works for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a translator. He does not believe his dreams will ever be realized, but he has hope for the next generation.

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