Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

July 22, 2016

On March 9, 2016, European leaders announced that the so-called "Balkan route" was closed after Croatia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Slovenia completely shut their borders to people trying to pass through to seek asylum in northern Europe. For thousands of people fleeing violence and persecution in their home countries, this route represented one of very few ways to reach safety and protection in Europe.

February 23, 2016

Thousands of men, women, and children are stranded between Greece and the Balkans after the sudden imposition of new border restrictions for Afghan refugees on the Western Balkans route this week. Refugees are being provided with no information and little-to-no humanitarian assistance, and are at risk of violence and abuse.

October 26, 2015

Thousands of people are entering Slovenia each day from different points along the Croatian border. While some are staying in overcrowded transit centers, others are forced to spend nights outdoors, sleeping in fields. In response, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are working alongside the Slovenian Ministry of Health in the transit center of Brezice, in addition to increasing their provision of humanitarian aid elsewhere in the area.

August 20, 2014

Since the June 18, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), which runs a mental health program in Hebron, has scaled up its activities and is trying to receive as many patients as possible, including children in a state of shock, and people with post-traumatic stress. In the space of one month, the team has carried out over a thousand consultations.

In the village of Salem, near Hebron, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) psychologist named Wissam meets with a woman called Um Taha for the second time. She is 48. Her husband died five years ago and she lives in Salem with her nine children.

Um Taha’s 28-year-old son was recently arrested by the Israeli army. Troops stormed the house one night, beat Um Taha and aimed a gun at her, she says. They also turned the house upside down, destroying everything they found.