Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

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August 22, 2017

The situation in and around Bangassou, CAR, has become very volatile as violence has spread throughout the region, leading to ongoing, massive displacement.

July 05, 2017

ZEMIO, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, JULY 5, 2017—More than 15,000 people have been displaced—with many wounded and unable to reach medical care—following clashes in Zemio, a town in eastern Central African Republic (CAR) where the medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs an HIV program. Zemio had been spared from much of the conflict raging in other regions of CAR until last week, when fighting broke out. 

CAR Central African Republic armed conflict
June 16, 2017

Thomas sits in a hospital ward in the Central African Republic (CAR) town of Bria. All his fingers on both hands have been amputated, his left arm is broken, and an external fixator supports one of his legs where machete blows cut through his thigh almost to the bone.

June 08, 2017

The conflict in Central African Republic (CAR) has escalated in recent weeks in several cities. The situation remains tense in Alindao, in the heart of the country, where an upsurge of fighting in May left at least 133 people dead and thousands more displaced. Last weekend, self-defense militia groups again attacked Alindao, attempting to take its airstrip and breaking into the Catholic mission where more than 15,000 people have taken shelter.

June 08, 2017

“Will Bambari be next?” This is the question on everyone’s lips in this market town on the Ouaka River in Central African Republic (CAR). Its residents worry that the violence that has engulfed the cities of Bangassou and Bria since early May 2017 could spread here.

CAR armed conflict displacement Bria Bangassou
May 19, 2017

Ongoing conflict between self-defense forces and ex-Séléka coalition dissidents led to more violence this week in Bria, a town where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs a pediatric program. The Central African Republic Ministry of Health, International Medical Corps, and MSF teams present in the town launched a contingency plan and, between May 15 and May 18, treated 44 casualties in Bria Hospital. An MSF surgical team arrived yesterday to assist the treatment of wounded patients in the hospital's operating theater.

January 24, 2017

The humanitarian crisis in the Central African Republic (CAR) has gone largely unnoticed internationally, except, perhaps, for one iconic image: a sea of displaced people huddled in the hulls of abandoned, rusty planes. This was Mpoko International Airport, in the capital, Bangui.

January 12, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams distributed nearly 100 tons of emergency food supplies to more than 10,000 people in northern Central African Republic (CAR) in recent weeks due to the lack of sufficient aid to people affected by armed conflict in the country.

December 14, 2016

Heavily pregnant, Miriam rests on the bed in the maternity ward in Am Timan Hospital in Chad as a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) gynecologist performs an ultrasound examination of her growing belly. She seems surprised when, unexpectedly, the outline of a baby appears on the monitor. Her expression quickly turns to relief as she listens to the translator standing next to the gynecologist who confirms that Miriam’s unborn child is progressing well.

November 10, 2016

Today is World Pneumonia Day. It's a somewhat abstract concept, associating a specific disease with a specific day, but the reality of pneumonia is very scary and dangerous, and possibly even deadly, for millions and millions of people around the globe.

Each year, pneumonia takes the lives of nearly one million children worldwide, often for want of a vaccine. There is in fact a vaccine to prevent it, something that's commonly administered to children in many western countries, but it’s too expensive for many countries to afford.

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