Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

August 15, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) nurse and researcher, Chenai Mathabire, received the International Aids Society 2017 TB/HIV Research Prize for research on a rapid tuberculosis (TB) test. View External Media.

July 25, 2017

At a time when life-saving antiretrovirals are more widely available than ever, an unacceptably high number of people are still dying of AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

November 30, 2016

It’s 8 a.m. and Alice Otiato is walking to Epworth Clinic in Zimbabwe in the bright morning sun, smiling as she greets patients and staff. She stops at the Day Clinic where sick patients are assessed, and quickly scans the room. Her eyes fix on a baby, only a few months old, hanging listlessly over her mother's shoulder.

July 21, 2016

Trade agreements and pressure on India’s ‘pharmacy of the developing world’ pose major threats to access

May 20, 2016

Noah Traoré was the first person in the Tombolia neighborhood to have his finger pricked at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) mobile clinic. "As the head of this neighborhood, I have to set an example," he says. "I love my community, so it is my duty to encourage them to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS."

September 30, 2015

GENEVA/JOHANNESBURG—The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières today applauded the new guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO) that all people be offered antiretroviral treatment immediately after testing positive for HIV. But MSF warned that turning this new recommendation into reality would require dramatically increased support from donors and governments.

March 06, 2014

Boston/New York, March 6, 2014—Two new studies released today by Epicentre,the research arm of the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) at CROI, the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, point to reductions in new HIV infections in areas where HIV treatment has been greatly expanded. The studies are some of the first to look at large-scale antiretroviral therapy (ART) rollout in real-world high-HIV-burden settings in sub-Saharan Africa, and its possible impact on reducing new infections.