Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

December 11, 2009

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is still providing surgical and medical health care to the displaced people in Vavuniya district, northern Sri Lanka. Some war-wounded need specific medical care, like orthopedic surgery, and around 95,000 people remain in Manik Farm camp. Additional medical capacities could be needed in the areas of return, as a result of the resettlement process.

July 13, 2009

Seven weeks after fighting ended between the Sri Lankan army and the Tamil Tiger rebels, fewer patients are arriving at the hospitals, but their numbers still exceed bed capacity.

June 04, 2009

While Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Health has set up a system to provide initial treatment to the wounded and sick people in displaced persons camps, the needs remain immense, requiring an around-the-clock medical presence in the camps to respond to all emergencies.

June 02, 2009

The situation remains extremely serious inside the hospitals and for the 269,000 displaced people in Vavuniya District.

May 26, 2009

MSF teams have been providing medical services day and night at different locations in Vavuniya district, including the hospital in Vavuniya city and at the checkpoint in Omanthai, close to the former frontline.

May 20, 2009

As the Sri Lankan government declares the end of the conflict, thousands of people are leaving the Vanni, the former conflict zone, and arriving in Vavuniya district in desperate need of medical care.

April 29, 2009

An interview with Lisabeth List, MSF Medical Coordinator in Vavuniya, Sri Lanka, about the 150,000 civilians that have escaped the war zone in northern Sri Lanka where Tamil Tiger rebels are positioned in a standoff against the ethnic Sinhalese government forces.

April 27, 2009

Patient numbers at Vavuniya hospital stabilized this past weekend as new arrivals were diverted to other hospitals. MSF has offered to scale up its medical activities and is currently in talks with authorities to do so.

April 24, 2009

"There are simply too many people to treat them all," says an MSF surgeon. "We are not able to save some people because we need to provide more aftercare. There are simply not enough nurses."

April 22, 2009

"Our hospital has got about 450 beds, and we’ve now got more than 1,700 patients in the hospital—on the floor, in the corridors, and even outside. So the hospital is very close to being overwhelmed."

Pages