Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

December 17, 2013

Tuberculosis (TB) and its drug-resistant forms are a global health threat to which children are particularly vulnerable.

March 22, 2013

Kyrgyzstan is among the 27 countries with the highest burdens of MDR-TB in the world.

July 07, 2011

In the former Soviet bloc country of Kyrgyzstan, MSF has been supporting TB care for prisoners since 2005. The aim is to reduce transmission of TB and treat those who have it. But working within the penitentiary system, which has proven to be a fertile breeding ground for the disease, presents some major challenges.

March 22, 2011

Dr Andrei Slavuckij, who has been following the evolution of TB in the former Soviet Union for the past dozen years, discusses the dynamics of the disease in a post-Soviet landscape.

March 23, 2010

One out of three prisoners with tuberculosis is released before the completion of treatment and faces enormous obstacles once outside the penitentiary system.

March 22, 2010

At one time, TB was considered on its way to being eradicated. However, the disease started a frightening comeback beginning in the 1980s and lasting through the present day.

November 16, 2009

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is on the rise worldwide and kills around 120,000 each year. The treatment of MDR-TB is very time-consuming and has prohibitively negative side effects. Many patients have difficulties remaining in treatment for up to two years and must at the same time endure the social stigma that comes with being infected by the deadly disease.

November 09, 2009

In the landlocked and mountainous country of Kyrgyzstan in central Asia, prisons have long been a breeding ground for tuberculosis (TB). Many prisoners are released before concluding their treatment and if they are unable to continue treatment they are more likely to delevop resistant strains of the disease.