Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

Topic

July 25, 2017

At a time when life-saving antiretrovirals are more widely available than ever, an unacceptably high number of people are still dying of AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

July 25, 2017

Greater global attention is needed to prevent and treat AIDS, as too many patients are dying despite the availability of antiretroviral treatment.

June 27, 2017

April 06, 2017

Less than a year after the official end of the Ebola outbreak, the Guinean health system continues to struggle.

March 17, 2017

October 21, 2016

More than two and a half years after the Ebola outbreak officially began, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is closing projects in West Africa that had been specifically dedicated to caring for people who survived the disease.

June 08, 2016

The severity of the West Africa Ebola epidemic saw Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) launch one of the largest emergency operations in its 44-year history.

June 02, 2016

In many contexts where Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works, key populations (also referred to as most-at-risk populations) such as sex workers and men who have sex with men have a higher risk of contracting HIV and a lower ability to access antiretroviral care due to stigma, discrimination, and their high mobility.

May 20, 2016

Noah Traoré was the first person in the Tombolia neighborhood to have his finger pricked at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) mobile clinic. "As the head of this neighborhood, I have to set an example," he says. "I love my community, so it is my duty to encourage them to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS."

May 12, 2016

The World Health Organization has just recommended that countries move toward shorter treatment regimens for some people with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), including people co-infected with HIV, children, and people with simple MDR-TB who have not been treated before or and have no known resistance to any of the drugs in the regimen. This recommendation comes following results from a number of large observation cohort studies using the shortened regimen.

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