Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

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November 17, 2017

Since September, a cholera epidemic in Chad has followed the meandering path of the Bahr-Azoum river—used by many for washing, bathing, and even drinking—southward from the eastern Sila region to the more heavily populated district of Am Timan, in Salamat region, near the border with Central African Republic.

November 13, 2017

The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), was told by the Pakistani authorities to close its medical activities in Bajaur Agency in north-western Pakistan. The closure will leave thousands of people in Bajaur Agency without access to free vital healthcare. The announcement comes just seven weeks after MSF was forced to close its project in Kurram Agency, also in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

November 01, 2017

The spread of hepatitis E in Niger’s Diffa region has slowed since Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) first began detecting and treating cases in early 2017, and the subsequent declaration of the outbreak by the Ministry of Health (MoH) in mid-April. Through a combination of active case finding, quicker diagnoses, a medical protocol, and working with the community through a network of volunteers, the case fatality rate has fallen.

October 30, 2017

The number of cholera cases reported in Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) cholera treatment centers (CTCs) in Yemen has significantly decreased since the peak of the outbreak. As a result, the international medical humanitarian organization is closing the majority of its cholera treatment centers or reducing their capacity.

The weekly number of admissions in MSF CTCs in Yemen shrank from 11,139 in the third week of June—at the peak of the outbreak—to 567 in the second week of October.

October 25, 2017

The offensive on Raqqa that started in June 2016 ended on October 17 when the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), supported by the international coalition, took control of the city, which has been cleared of fighters from the Islamic State (IS) group. However, the end of the battle in Raqqa doesn’t mean that the war in this part of Syria is over—or that people in the region are no longer suffering.

October 19, 2017

On October 18 Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began working with local authorities to tackle an outbreak of pneumonic plague in the port city of Tamatave on the east coast of Madagascar.

MSF’s international medical personnel are supporting staff from the Malagasy Ministry of Health to provide treatment to patients currently hospitalized in the plague triage and treatment center. This specialized facility was built earlier this week outside the city’s hospital by international partners, including MSF.

October 19, 2017

Since late August, more than 530,000 ethnic Rohingya refugees have fled targeted violence in Myanmar to seek safety in Bangladesh, according to the Inter Sector Coordination Group. This is among the largest and fastest-growing refugee emergencies in decades. However, the Rohingya refugee crisis is not new. MSF has provided medical aid to the Rohingya in Bangladesh for decades.

October 18, 2017

In response to the unfolding humanitarian crisis in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has massively increased its operations in the country. This scale-up follows the influx of more than 582,000 Rohingya refugees since August 25, after a wave of targeted violence against the Rohingya in neighboring Myanmar’s Rakhine state.

October 10, 2017

MSF began providing primary health services in Nariño department in 2010 and started offering mental health services in urban areas of Tumaco in 2014 following a surge in violence.

Ethiopia mental health
October 03, 2017

In recent years, severe drought and the resulting die-off of livestock have forced thousands of formerly nomadic people to settle near Galorgube, a small town in the Doolo Zone of Ethiopia’s Somali region. The situation has led to a humanitarian emergency in the area, with an acute malnutrition crisis and outbreaks of disease taking a heavy toll on the displaced population. The number of young children with severe acute malnutrition in Doolo Zone is now at the highest point in the ten years Doctors Without Border/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has worked in the area.

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