Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

March 24, 2017

NEW YORK, MARCH 24, 2017—Today, World Tuberculosis Day, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF) is urging pharmaceutical corporations, Sequella and Pfizer, to provide open access to all existing clinical data on a promising drug, sutezolid, to help accelerate the research and development of urgently needed new, lifesaving TB treatment regimes. This data, if not released, will take years and resources to replicate, further delaying new treatment options for people living with TB.

February 23, 2017

"You see, I am healed," says Tholakele as she walks around her ward demonstrating her recovery. "Even my legs don't give me problems anymore. Now I can walk perfectly. I walk around the hospital; go out for fresh air and come back when I’m ready."

Tholakele, 39, has drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) and started treatment in May 2016 at the Moneni National TB Hospital, supported by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in central Swaziland.

January 24, 2017

While deal marks a critical step in the fight against TB, health groups warn that the deal lacks safeguards that would ensure worldwide affordability

January 19, 2017

NEW YORK, JANUARY 20, 2017—The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began a new clinical trial this week in Uzbekistan to develop a radically improved course of treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB).

The trial aims to find a treatment regimen for DR-TB that is drastically shorter, more effective, and causes fewer side effects than the current treatment options.

November 07, 2016

In an attempt to break up the everyday routine for children undergoing tuberculosis treatment in Tajikistan, the MSF psychosocial team organizes celebration parties as part of MSF’s pediatric therapeutic play program.

October 25, 2016

South Africa has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis (TB) and drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the world, with more than 20,000 people diagnosed with DR-TB in 2015. Yet the current DR-TB treatment regimen—which consists of a combination of multiple pills and daily injections—is only successful in about half of all people who receive it. New drugs such as delamanid offer the opportunity to provide more successful, tolerable treatment regimens to patients with few other options available.

May 12, 2016

The World Health Organization has just recommended that countries move toward shorter treatment regimens for some people with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), including people co-infected with HIV, children, and people with simple MDR-TB who have not been treated before or and have no known resistance to any of the drugs in the regimen. This recommendation comes following results from a number of large observation cohort studies using the shortened regimen.

March 23, 2016

Since 2006, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing ambulatory medical and psychosocial care for people in Mumbai living with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DRTB), HIV, hepatitis C, or a combination of these diseases. The majority of the patients are HIV positive who require second or third line treatment. Narendra* is one of only two percent of drug-resistant TB patients in need that have access to these new drugs.

March 21, 2016

New York/Geneva, March 21, 2016—Two years after two new drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB)—the first in over 50 years—were conditionally approved for use, only two percent of the 150,000 people who need them most have been able to access them, according to Doctors Without Borders’ new edition of DR-TB Drugs Under the Microscope.

February 24, 2016

International medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today expressed great concern at the high price announced for the new tuberculosis (TB) drug delamanid. Japanese pharmaceutical company Otsuka said that it would make delamanid available to some developing countries at a price of $1,700 per treatment course.

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