• In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.


May 24, 2011

Allen Grolla, Steven M. Jones, Lisa Fernando, James E. Strong, Ute Ströher, Peggy Möller, Janusz T. Paweska, Felicity Burt, Pedro Pablo Palma, Armand Sprecher, Pierre Formenty, Cathy Roth, Heinz Feldmann
PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2011;5(5):e1183
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases

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May 03, 2010

Paul Roddy, Sara L. Thomas, Benjamin Jeffs, Pascoal Nascimento Folo, Pedro Pablo Palma, Bengi Moco Henrique, Luis Villa, Fernando Paixao Damiao Machado, Oscar Bernal, Steven M. Jones, James E. Strong, Heinz Feldmann, Matthias Borchert
Journal of Infectious Diseases 2010;201(12):1909-18. (doi: 10.1086/652748)

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October 05, 2008

P Roddy, A Marchiol, B Jeffs, PP Palma, O Bernal, O de la Rosa, M Borchert
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2009;103:200-202. (doi: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2008.09.001)

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December 05, 2007

Johannesburg/Brussels/Kinshasa, December 5th, 2007 – The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) denounces the pervasive and systematic use of rape and violence perpetrated by the Angolan army during the expulsions of Congolese migrants working in diamond mines in the Angolan province of Lunda Norte.

November 29, 2006

New York, November 29, 2006 — Following the latest outbreak of the cholera epidemic that resurfaced with the arrival of seasonal rains, the international humanitarian medical organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has reopened its previous intervention in Lubango in southern Angola. Since the beginning of November, the number of patients has continued to rise—1,427 to date—and mortality remains very high.

May 17, 2006

Luanda, Angola, May 17, 2006 – The disastrous state of the water supply and sanitation infrastructure in Luanda and other large cities is the principal reason for the rapid spread of cholera in Angola. As of May 14, more than 34,000 people have fallen ill with cholera (17,500 in Luanda alone) and over 1,200 have died. Though the Angolan authorities have taken some initiatives to limit the spread of the disease, the international humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) calls for a dramatically stepped up emergency intervention by the Government of Angola and international agencies.

May 17, 2006

The disastrous state of the water supply and sanitation infrastructure in Luanda and other large Angolan cities is the primary reason for the rapid spread of cholera

May 05, 2006

Luanda, May 5, 2006  - More than 27,800 people in Angola are now infected with cholera, up from 20,000 approximately one week ago. More than 1,100 people have already died, and the disease has spread to ten provinces. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is operating cholera treatment centers in seven provinces and has treated more than 16,000 people and delivered more than 320 tons of medical and logistical supplies since the outbreak began in February.

April 30, 2006

Since February 2006, the Angolan capital of Luanda has been experiencing its worst ever cholera epidemic, with an average of 500 new cases per day. The outbreak has also rapidly spread to other areas; to date, 11 of Angola’s 18 provinces are reporting cases.

April 13, 2006

Luanda, 13 April 2006 – As the outbreak of cholera is rapidly spreading in Luanda, capital of Angola, and to other parts of the country, the international humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) urges the Angolan authorities to officially declare the outbreak and immediately take all the necessary measures needed for controlling it.