• In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.


June 19, 2015

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has learned that the Chinese patent office has just denied Gilead Science’s request for a key patent on the hepatitis C drug sofosbuvir. This drug, together with other antivirals, is the backbone of several newer, more effective curative treatments for hepatitis C, yet is exorbitantly priced in many countries, restricting access for people who need it. Hepatitis C is a global public health crisis, with at least 150 million people living with the disease, and 350,000-500,000 people die each year from complications of it.

October 28, 2010

"Since the project started in 2003, the quality of medical care offered to HIV patients in Guangxi Province has vastly improved,” said Gilles Isard, head of mission for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in China.

April 21, 2010

According to the latest figures, the quake in Yushu killed 2,064 people and injured 12,135.

April 20, 2010

A three-person MSF assessment team arrived to the town of Jiegu in Yushu on Saturday evening and spent Sunday meeting officials and looking at medical needs.

April 15, 2010

Chinese media reports 760 dead, 11,500 injuried by earthquake in Qinghai Province

April 14, 2010

Following a 6.9-magnitude earthquake in China’s Qinghai province early Wednesday, MSF is sending a three-person team to asses the situation.

May 08, 2009

On May 12, 2008, a devastating earthquake hit Sichuan province, leaving more than 80,000 dead and 10 million homeless. One year on, displaced people who lost their families, homes, and jobs in the quake are still suffering from psychological disorders and are in need of support to rebuild their lives. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been continuing psychological care to the earthquake victims.

May 08, 2009

On May 12, 2008, a 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck southwestern Sichuan Province in China, leaving more than 80,000 people dead and 370,000 people injured. The quake's epicenter was in Wenchuan, in the northwest of Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan province. Some 90,000 buildings collapsed and more than 10 million people left homeless. Up to 40 international staff and 16 national staff of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) have worked in affected areas providing relief materials, medical care, and psychological support. Today, MSF continues to offer psychological care to affected people in Sichuan.

February 10, 2009

After attempting for almost two years to reach an agreement with China’s tuberculosis (TB) control program, MSF has given up on its efforts to start a project in Inner-Mongolia for assisting people suffering from multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB).

August 11, 2008

Many people are still experiencing a deep sense of loss, grief, and mourning after such a terrifying event. On the other hand, most of our patients are showing signs of recovery and we no longer come across emaciated patients who have not eaten for days, or those suffering from persistent sleep disturbances.