• In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.


March 24, 2013

MSF has been forced to cancel a conference on medical ethics due to take place in Bahrain in April because of a lack of assurances from authorities.

September 18, 2012

Dr. Unni Karunakara, international president of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), met yesterday in Geneva with a Bahraini parliamentary delegation that included the Minister of Human Rights Dr. Salah Bin Ali Abdularahman.

Dr. Karunakara raised issues related to the need for impartial access to health care in Bahrain, and the obligation of medical staff to provide health care regardless of patients’ political or sectarian affiliations.

April 12, 2012

In Bahrain, people continue to avoid seeking medical care in public hospitals for fear of discrimination, harassment, and ill treatment.

August 05, 2011

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) welcomes the release of Saeed Mahdi, and recognizes that he has now been granted access to a lawyer. MSF firmly maintains that Saeed Mahdi was working with the organization in the capacity of driver and translator. We remain concerned about the circumstances in which he was arrested. MSF is still unable to resume working in Bahrain without guarantees that its premises and personnel would be respected.

August 03, 2011

MSF condemns the armed raid of its premises in Bahrain on July 28 and the subsequent detention of one of its staff members.

July 19, 2011

Using medical aid as a camouflage for military advantage threatens the lives of patients in the most precarious and embattled places worldwide. 

June 14, 2011

An MSF staff member detained for weeks in Bahrain was released uncharged on June 11.

May 31, 2011

Saeed Mahdi has been detained for weeks in Bahrain after being severely beaten upon arrest by authorities. No information has been provided about his condition and whereabouts.

May 31, 2011

It’s showtime for the zip-zap circus in Cape Town. All these children are HIV-positive. But that doesn’t prevent them from living a very active and creative live, because they are all receiving antiretroviral treatment. In this five-part video series, MSF demonstrates tools and models that could help make improved treatment accessible to many more. Between June 8 and 10, 2011, world leaders will meet in New York to decide on the future of the millions needing treatment urgently. By sharing this video, help us spread the word that there is NO EXCUSE for governments to leave 10 million people untreated! See for more info.

May 12, 2011

Doctors and nurses in Bahrain must be allowed to provide healthcare in line with medical ethics, without the fear of reprisal, says MSF General Director Christopher Stokes.