MSF frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in roughly 70 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Topic

Harmful rules in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal will mean people in developing countries will have less access to lifesaving medicines.

More >

MSF's Leena Menghaney explains that the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement would limit access to medicine by preventing the manufacture of affordable generic drugs.

More >

The price of first- and second-line ARVs to treat HIV are falling because of increased competition among generic producers, but newer ARVs continue to be priced astronomically high.

More >

MSF testifies in Congress on India's right to keep lifesaving medicines affordable.

More >

Have you heard about the Trans-Pacific Trade Pact (TPP)? No? You're not alone. Negotiations are being conducted in secret, behind closed doors. But it's slated to become the most harmful trade agreement ever for access to medicines. It's not too late to act. Ask countries negotiating the TPP to protect people in developing countries. Click here for details.

More >

On April 1, 2013, a landmark ruling by India's Supreme Court ensured continued access to affordable HIV medication for the millions affected by this disease, including the 220,000 patients that Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treats with generic HIV/AIDS medication. This access has been under threat for the past seven years by pharmaceutical company Novartis, which challenged a section of India's Patents Act that prevented the practice of "evergreening," or extending the patent of an existing medicine by modifying it slightly. By extending patents, pharmaceutical companies prevent the manufacture of generic drugs. The ruling by India's Supreme Court is a victory for those fighting for access to affordable medicine—at least, for the time being.

More >

  U.S. proposals in the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade talks will make lifesaving medicines unaffordable for many people who need them, MSF warns.

More >

The January 2013 Month In Focus features brief reports on the following Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) activities: assisting destitute civilians in Syria; a positive report on treatment of tuberculosis; an international conference in New York on fatally neglected diseases; monitoring the situation in Yida refugee camp in South Sudan; and preventing a measles epidemic among displaced children in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

More >

The first new drug approved to treat tuberculosis (TB) since 1963 could result in shorter treatment with less side effects and the opportunity to treat more people. For people with drug-resistant TB, it could present a new lifeline.

More >

This short video report details a conference co-hosted at Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s Global Health Program in New York by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) that brought researchers, global health experts, and donors together to discuss the profound need for research and development initiatives in the field of neglected diseases. Since these diseases usually affect poor populations, research for finding better drugs and diagnostics for them is scarce. Click here for more details on the conference.

More >

Pages