MSF frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in roughly 70 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

A new drug for the neglected disease sleeping sickness is currently in clinical trials; if the trials are conclusive, Fexinidazole could be registered within two years and sleeping sickness could be eradicated around 2020. This drug would be a vast improvement over current treatment as it's much simpler to administer and thus accessible to many more people. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and other partner organizations established Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) in 2003 to develop new treatments for neglected diseases, including sleeping sickness.

More >

This short video report details a conference co-hosted at Mount Sinai School of Medicine’s Global Health Program in New York by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) that brought researchers, global health experts, and donors together to discuss the profound need for research and development initiatives in the field of neglected diseases. Since these diseases usually affect poor populations, research for finding better drugs and diagnostics for them is scarce. Click here for more details on the conference.

More >

Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), VII Photo, and UNION HZ present FATAL NEGLECT, a six-part documentary film project, that tells the stories of millions of patients left behind by the global health revolution. In Fatal Neglect: The Global Health Revolution’s Forgotten Patients, VII photographers Seamus Murphy, Venetia Dearden, Ron Haviv, and John Stanmeyer document the impact of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, the three deadliest neglected tropical diseases—(visceral leishmaniasis (kala azar), Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), and Chagas—and vaccine-preventable diseases. The award-winning photojournalists traveled to Mali, Paraguay, South Sudan, and Tajikistan to capture the stories of frontline health workers trying to fight diseases that affect millions of people and kill hundreds of thousands each year yet garner little attention from drug developers, policy makers, or the mass media.

More >