Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

Topic

July 29, 2016

JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN/NEW YORK, JULY 29, 2016 — The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is responding to a cholera outbreak in Juba by vaccinating people at high risk, providing clean drinking water and supporting medical treatment, as more than 300 cases have been recorded in the city, including five deaths.

May 27, 2016

Mandera County, in northeastern Kenya, is the latest to be affected by an ongoing cholera outbreak that has been spreading throughout the country for the past 17 months. Since April 2016, almost 800 cases have been reported in Mandera, including 11 deaths. The outbreak is concentrated in Mandera Township, home to around 90,000 people.

May 19, 2016

The O’Neill Report is the British Government’s response to tackling the emerging antibiotic resistance crisis. In order to overcome this global threat, all countries must play their part and take action to address the crisis, including funding research and development for new tools—new classes of antibiotics, but also diagnostics and vaccines—while ensuring sustainable and affordable access for those new tools. At the same time, steps need to be taken to conserve existing antibiotics for as long as possible.

May 17, 2016

There is a book kept under lock and key at all times in the tented HIV and tuberculosis (TB) ward of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Bentiu, South Sudan. It doesn’t look like much—its blue ink has started to fade and its pages emit a strong smell of must, mold, and swamp water.

May 12, 2016

The World Health Organization has just recommended that countries move toward shorter treatment regimens for some people with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), including people co-infected with HIV, children, and people with simple MDR-TB who have not been treated before or and have no known resistance to any of the drugs in the regimen. This recommendation comes following results from a number of large observation cohort studies using the shortened regimen.

May 05, 2016

Since the beginning of 2016, an outbreak of meningitis C has hit every region of Niger. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) emergency teams have been working with the Nigerien Ministry of Health (MoH) to contain the epidemic since January. The number of weekly cases is now decreasing, but there are insufficient stocks of vaccine available to protect those at risk in the event of another outbreak.

April 08, 2016

New York/Lusaka, Zambia—The largest cholera vaccination campaign ever began today in Zambia’s capital, Lusaka. International medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working in close collaboration with the Zambian Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization to vaccinate more than half a million people in the next two weeks to curb the outbreak that began in February in the city’s overcrowded township areas.

March 29, 2016

MSF urges Indian Prime Minister not to cave into pressure from EU to accept trade deal that could prevent millions of people from accessing lifesaving medicines

March 23, 2016

Since 2006, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing ambulatory medical and psychosocial care for people in Mumbai living with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DRTB), HIV, hepatitis C, or a combination of these diseases. The majority of the patients are HIV positive who require second or third line treatment. Narendra* is one of only two percent of drug-resistant TB patients in need that have access to these new drugs.

March 21, 2016

New York/Geneva, March 21, 2016—Two years after two new drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB)—the first in over 50 years—were conditionally approved for use, only two percent of the 150,000 people who need them most have been able to access them, according to Doctors Without Borders’ new edition of DR-TB Drugs Under the Microscope.

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