Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.



October 12, 2016

“The World Health Organization’s annual look at the global state of tuberculosis this year makes for a shockingly bad report card: countries are failing to diagnose and treat millions of people with TB, which caused 1.8 million deaths last year. Governments need to get their heads out of the sand and realize that TB is not a disease consigned to the 1800s; we see and treat TB in our clinics every day, and it’s a deadly threat to all of us.

September 21, 2016

"Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) welcomes the United Nations’s (UN) Political Declaration Antimicrobial Resistance, which recognizes the need to address – at the highest political levels – the complex issue of drug-resistant infections, which affect people in every part of the world. Now, governments have the responsibility to turn these words into action and fully implement nationally-tailored plans and global commitments to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

September 16, 2016

"The sustainable development goals (SDGs) adopted with much fanfare just a year ago seek to end HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria by 2030. The replenishment of the Global Fund is the first concrete action taken by the international community since the adoption of these goals, and therefore a first test of the world leaders' will to make them a reality. Failure to reach the relatively modest Global Fund's replenishment target would be a clear message that the SDGs were but empty promises to the millions who, every year, continue to suffer and die from HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria."

September 14, 2016

New report exposes pharmaceutical industry failings and highlights new ways of researching and developing medicines that address public health needs.

August 25, 2016

Dr. Erlend Grønningen from Trondheim, Norway is a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supervising medical doctor at Boost Hospital in Lashkar Gah, capital of Afghanistan’s Helmand province. Dr Gronningen arrived in Afghanistan in April, 2016, and primarily focuses on internal medicine, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB). This is his second assignment with MSF, having worked in South Sudan in 2014.

May 17, 2016

There is a book kept under lock and key at all times in the tented HIV and tuberculosis (TB) ward of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in Bentiu, South Sudan. It doesn’t look like much—its blue ink has started to fade and its pages emit a strong smell of must, mold, and swamp water.

May 12, 2016

The World Health Organization has just recommended that countries move toward shorter treatment regimens for some people with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), including people co-infected with HIV, children, and people with simple MDR-TB who have not been treated before or and have no known resistance to any of the drugs in the regimen. This recommendation comes following results from a number of large observation cohort studies using the shortened regimen.

March 29, 2016

MSF urges Indian Prime Minister not to cave into pressure from EU to accept trade deal that could prevent millions of people from accessing lifesaving medicines

March 23, 2016

Since 2006, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing ambulatory medical and psychosocial care for people in Mumbai living with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DRTB), HIV, hepatitis C, or a combination of these diseases. The majority of the patients are HIV positive who require second or third line treatment. Narendra* is one of only two percent of drug-resistant TB patients in need that have access to these new drugs.

March 21, 2016

New York/Geneva, March 21, 2016—Two years after two new drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB)—the first in over 50 years—were conditionally approved for use, only two percent of the 150,000 people who need them most have been able to access them, according to Doctors Without Borders’ new edition of DR-TB Drugs Under the Microscope.