• In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.



November 24, 2015

Sierra Leone has finally been declared Ebola-free, but many of the 4,000 survivors of this deadly epidemic continue to suffer. They report having painful joints, chronic fatigue, vision or hearing impairment, as well as depression and post-traumatic stress. It is difficult for them to get treatment, and people still fear Ebola survivors. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working to assist them.

November 13, 2015

Cristina Carreño, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) medical coordinator, Jerusalem

What is the MSF position on the incident in which a patient was taken and one of his caretakers killed in a Hebron hospital?

The incident occurred at El Ahli Hospital, which is not an MSF facility. However, the patient was receiving care in MSF’s mental health support program for victims of political violence.

September 15, 2015

On Sunday September 13, a wooden boat carrying more than 130 refugees and migrants sank off the Greek island of Farmakonisi. Thirty four people lost their lives, amongst them four babies and 11 children. The people who survived the shipwreck were brought by the Greek Coast guard to the neighboring island of Leros. An MSF team from Kos was sent to Leros immediately to provide mental health support and medical care to survivors.

August 27, 2015

Attacks perpetrated by Boko Haram in the Lake Chad region of Chad have increased over recent weeks, and military presence in the area has also expanded in response. The number of people who have been forced to flee their homes has more than doubled, bringing the total number of displaced in the area to 75,000. The fear that has been instilled in the population—consisting of refugees from Niger and Nigeria, as well as Chadians themselves—has only been exacerbated by the continuing violence which shows no sign of abating.

August 12, 2015

Mohammed, Diana, and Azeel

Thirty-five-year-old Mohammed clutches his one-year-old daughter Azeel in his arms while his wife Diana, her eyes bright red from salty sea water, tries to collect herself inside the hospital area on board the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) rescue ship Dignity 1.

August 05, 2015

In places with high HIV or tuberculosis (TB) burdens and significant shortages of human resources for health care work, lay counsellors have become extremely important. They provide HIV testing and counselling and help patients get through difficult challenges in adhering to HIV and TB treatments. But their crucial involvement in treatment programs is critically underfunded.

August 05, 2015

In settings with a high HIV/TB burden and significant shortages of human resources for health (HRH), task shifting strategies have relied on lay workers to provide HIV testing and counselling (HTC) and adherence support for HIV and TB treatments.

While in some countries these tasks were integrated into the work of existing community cadres such as community health workers, new basic cadres have been created and trained in other countries, supported mainly through international funds.

July 30, 2015

By Karen Stewart, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Very early one morning a few years ago, nine-year-old Annie appeared in the waiting area at our clinic in Lae, Papua New Guinea (PNG), clutching her mother and staring at the floor. Her mother told the registrar that Annie had not spoken a word, nor attended school, in two years. She didn’t know what was wrong with Annie and wanted her tested to find out if the child had had sex.

July 08, 2015

These women have the heroic qualities that mark many women living in the Palestinian Territories.

July 07, 2015

By Jason Cone

Stepping out of a car in the West Bank town of Kafr Qaddum, I was greeted by the stench of urine, feces, and burnt tires—a foul reminder of the near-constant confrontation between Israeli settlers and soldiers on one side, and Palestinians on the other.