• In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.


September 03, 2015

On September 2, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) boats Dignity I and Bourbon Argos—together with the MY Phoenix, operated jointly with the Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS)—rescued 1,658 people, making it MSF’s busiest day on the Mediterranean Sea since operations began in May. In six separate rescue operations, the three search and rescue vessels brought on board people primarily from Eritrea, Nigeria, and Somalia, including 547 women and 199 children, toddlers and babies among them.

August 12, 2015

Mohammed, Diana, and Azeel

Thirty-five-year-old Mohammed clutches his one-year-old daughter Azeel in his arms while his wife Diana, her eyes bright red from salty sea water, tries to collect herself inside the hospital area on board the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) rescue ship Dignity 1.

July 28, 2015

Agathe Farini Sena, otherwise known as Maman Agathe, is a counselor at the Village d’Accueil, or Home Village, in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where women with high-risk pregnancies stay as they wait to give birth. By staying here, they have access to high-quality health care at the adjacent MSF-supported Masisi general hospital, where last year MSF and Ministry of Health teams delivered more than 3,000 babies.

July 27, 2015

Agathe Farini Sena, otherwise known as Maman Agathe, is a counselor at the Village d’Accueil at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) -supported Masisi general hospital in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo. Women with high-risk pregnancies stay at the facility as they wait to give birth. This way, when the time comes, they have access to high quality healthcare to ensure they give birth safely. Read more. #TomorrowNeedsHer

July 27, 2015

Maman Agathe’s job is to make sure the 70-odd mothers-to-be staying at the Village d’Accueil are happy, healthy and at ease in the days before the big event.

July 23, 2015

In the maternity ward of Dolo Ado health center, Ethiopia, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) midwife Aisha Akello has an emotional discussion with a woman sitting on the hospital bed. Unlike the rest of the women in the modest ward, lying next to their newborn babies in their respective beds, Rabiya Osman, 23, is all by herself. She looks weary and pale. She seems a bit inattentive to what the midwife is saying—lost in deep thoughts of her own. Shyly, she looks into the midwife’s eyes and nods her head. Two days ago, Rabiya went into labor at home.

June 10, 2015

In Ivory Coast, years of instability have severely weakened health services and led to a lack of both facilities and trained staff. The dearth of options available to expectant mothers and their babies has resulted in particularly high levels of maternal mortality. In July 2014, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)—already working in maternity units in Duékoué and Abobo—opened a program to care for pregnant women and newborns at Katiola Regional Hospital Center (RHC), north of Bouaké.

May 28, 2015

In November 2014, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) launched a pediatric project in the region of Bafatá in central Guinea-Bissau. With an infant mortality rate of 116 per 1,000 children, Guinea-Bissau is among the 10 countries with the worst maternal and child health indicators in the world. Here, Isabel Grovas, the MSF medical coordinator in charge of opening the project, discusses the situation.

May 20, 2015

The Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) mother and child project in Irbid, northern Jordan, has been augmented to perform complicated deliveries, including Caesarean sections, and provide improved neonatal care to Syrian refugees in the region.

May 20, 2015

Ahlam* is a 22-year-old mother from Dara’a governorate in Syria. She is the mother of two children, both of whom were born at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital for mother and child care in Irbid, Jordan. Here, Ahlam tells her story and recounts some of the challenges she has faced since she crossed the border to Jordan in 2012.