• In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.


Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.



November 30, 2015

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Despite considerable investments in supply chain reforms, wide-spread medicines stock outs negatively constrain patients’ ability to have access to their medication. Limited availability of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) caused by dysfunctional supply chains impedes patient initiation and adherence and poses a major barrier to win the global fight against HIV.

November 30, 2015

JOHANNESBURG/HARARE—The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today warned that lifesaving antiretroviral medicines (ARVs) are routinely not making their way to patients in sub-Saharan Africa, most often despite sufficient stocks already being present in countries, and called for urgent improvements in ARV supply chains in the region.

November 24, 2015

Watch video clips from several Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) projects and activies in November 2015. Get reports from Greece, Syria, Central African Republic, Sierra Leone, and Pakistan, and learn why improved access to HIV treatment has not reached everyone who urgently needs it.

November 24, 2015

Sierra Leone has finally been declared Ebola-free, but many of the 4,000 survivors of this deadly epidemic continue to suffer. They report having painful joints, chronic fatigue, vision or hearing impairment, as well as depression and post-traumatic stress. It is difficult for them to get treatment, and people still fear Ebola survivors. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working to assist them.

November 24, 2015

The World Health Organization (WHO) now recommends putting everyone infected with HIV on treatment immediately. But some 20 million people living with HIV around the world remain without the care they need. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working to simplify treatment and adapt it to individual needs to help everyone who needs care get access to it.

November 12, 2015

A deadly measles epidemic continues to spread through Katanga province, in southern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), with devastating effects on the very young. For the past two months, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor Marion Osterberger has been working in Ankoro hospital, which has become so overcrowded with patients that up to five children have had to share each bed.

November 06, 2015

The Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone was declared over on November 7, 2015, but in neighboring Guinea, people are still being infected by the disease, which has claimed more than 11,000 lives in West Africa. Despite the unprecedented scale of the epidemic, there is still much that is unknown about Ebola. How long does the virus survive? Could Ebola become endemic in the region? What medical challenges do survivors face?

October 30, 2015

In Yemen, the poorest country on the Arabian Peninsula, more than 1,300 people living with HIV/AIDS are receiving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. Around half of them live in the capital, Sana’a. Ensuring that those who need treatment have access to their medicines is a critical challenge, especially with the outbreak of war in March 2015.

October 28, 2015

JOHANNESBURG—After six months of persistent supply problems with the key HIV medicine lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r), the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) urged the South African government to put the public’s health first and override pharmaceutical company AbbVie’s patent with a "compulsory licence," in order to allow generic versions of LPV/r to be used in the country.

October 22, 2015

A widespread measles epidemic has hit in the southern region of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).