Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

Topic

March 10, 2011

At Boost Hospital in Afghanistan's Helmand province, MSF is tending to civilians caught in an ongoing conflict, in a region where medical resources have been scarce for many years.

March 10, 2011

Today, on International Women's Day, another woman will join the some 2 million others suffering from obstetric fistula.  
 

March 10, 2011

As the fighting and bombardments intensify, MSF is supporting a lifeline of medical supplies running from Benghazi to other flashpoints where large numbers of wounded are being reported.

March 10, 2011

Kala Azar is a neglected tropical disease responsible for 51,000 deaths every year. MSF Health Advisor Koert Ritmeijer explains that while treatment for the disease is lengthy, once cured, individuals cannot contract the disease again. Left untreated, the disease is 100 percent fatal.

March 08, 2011

Usually the result of complications during delivery, a fistula is an opening between the bladder and the vagina, or between the rectum and the vagina. Women become incontinent, and are often shunned from their societies and families as a result. They can also suffer additional medical consequences. Access to pre-natal care and interventions to assist with complicated labor, including C-sections are essential to preventing fistulas.

March 08, 2011

MSF denies all reports that a medical doctor working for MSF was taken in Benghazi on March 8.

March 08, 2011

MSF continues to look for ways to deliver medicine, supplies, and care to areas affected by violence  

March 07, 2011

Obstetric fistulas, most often the result of prolonged obstructed labor, is an opening that occurs between the bladder and the vagina, or between the rectum and the vagina and causes a woman to become incontinent, among other devastating medical and social consequences. According to the UN, an estimated two million women live with fistulas today—about half of them in Nigeria.

March 06, 2011


Yolanda Mueller, Susanna Cristofani, Carmen Rodriguez, Rohani T Malaguiok, Tatiana Gil, Rebecca F Grais, Renato Souza
Confl Health 2011;5:3
Conflict and Health

Read more

March 04, 2011

Usually the result of complications during delivery, a fistula is an opening between the bladder and the vagina, or between the rectum and the vagina. Women become incontinent, and are often shunned from their societies and families as a result. They can also suffer additional medical consequences. In 2010, MSF teams operated on and treated about 1,000 women suffering from fistulas, in permanent structures and in "fistula camps." In November, MSF ran a fistula camp in Boguila, western Central African Republic.

Pages