Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

Topic

July 15, 2010

MSF responds to a bomb explosion in Mingora, the main city of Swat District in Khyber Pathkunkhwa Province.

July 15, 2010

In northwestern Nigeria, MSF, in collaboration with the State Ministry of Health, continues to provide emergency treatment for children under fiver years old with lead poisoning. The cleaning up of contaminted sights remains critical to treatment activities.

July 14, 2010

Every six seconds worldwide, a child dies from malnutrition. Despite this alarming fact, childhood malnutrition remains under-documented and fundamentally misunderstood, reports Doctors Without Borders. To draw attention to the crisis, they called upon experienced photojournalists to visit seven countries, from war zones to impoverished regions to emerging economies, to create the multimedia series “Starved for Attention.”

July 13, 2010

Six months after the earthquake that devastated Haiti, the Clerger family has had to divide up. There is no work to be found, and they still have received no help beyond MSF's medical assistance. Part one of thier story is here.

July 13, 2010

Six months after the January 12 earthquake that devastated Haiti, people still struggle to live. MSF continues to provide a wide range of medical, mental health, and hygiene assistance.

July 12, 2010

MSF is helping to provide much-needed emergency care for a growing number of patients in Helmand province.

July 12, 2010

MSF staff in Lashkargah have treated more than 1,500 children already this year.

July 12, 2010

Six months after the earthquake in Haiti, MSF is running 19 health facilities in and around Port-au-Prince and the needs are still huge.

July 09, 2010

The picture of starvation in Africa is one we think we know. “We tend to think of it as a lonely child in the middle of nowhere with a vulture hanging over her,” Marcus Bleasdale said. “It’s not like that at all. There is a very concerned family. Hundreds of doctors go into making these children well again.”

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