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  • In this issue we discuss the importance of vaccination for children under five to prevent debilitating and potentially fatal diseases. We also visit South Africa, where one young woman's story illustrates the critical need for access to medicines, and two MSF field workers in war-torn Syria recount their experiences.

  • A forgotten war in northern Uganda. Violence in Ivory Coast. MSF's efforts to fight measles in Darfur. Mental health care in times of conflict. Responding to emergencies in the Congo. On the frontlines of AIDS treatment. Closing programs in Iraq. All in this issue of Alert.

  • The project coordinator of an MSF team in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, kept a diary describing the tense and often overwhelming period of fighting when staff worked continuously to treat the wounded and sick. And, an MSF study in Niger shows how effective ready-to-use foods can be in a malnutrition emergency.

  • In this issue, we take you inside the neglected crisis in Central African Republic, in addition to stories on Chad, access to medicines, and surgery in war-torn Syria.

  • In this issue, we focus on MSF's work in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the ongoing conflict has physically and emotionally traumatized its people. We also consider other pertinent health and medical issues, such as Trans-Pacific Partnership; drug-resistent tuberculosis; and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

  • In this issue, MSF staff answer fundamental questions about our operations—from how we recruit staff, respond to emergencies, and deliver supplies, to how we close projects and share our medical findings with the global health community.

  • Welcome to our new Alert. This is the first issue of MSF-USA’s re-designed quarterly newsletter, and we hope you like it. This issue of Alert highlights devastating crises in South Sudan and Syria, conflict-related emergencies that are causing mass casualties and extensive displacement. In both places (and in neighboring countries), our medical teams are doing as much as they can to ease suffering and save lives.

  • Two years after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake left much of the country's already fragile infrastructure in tatters, the people of Haiti remain in desperate need of assistance. In this issue, a look at Drouillard Hospital, an MSF-run facility in the Cite Soleil slum of Port-au-Prince where MSF provides the city's only free treatment for severe burns. Also in this issue: a project update on MSF's efforts to combat chronic malnutrition in Africa's Sahel region, an interview with the head of MSF's Emergency Team, and a field journal from HIV/AIDS Policy Adviser Sharonann Lynch, who recently visited an innovative HIV care program in rural Mozambique.

  • While MSF has been unable to work directly in Syria, it has collected testimonies from wounded patients treated outside the country and from doctors inside Syria. These testimonies point to a coordinated crackdown on the provision of urgent medical care for people wounded in Syria's ongoing violence. Also in this issue: MSF field journals from Gogrial and Doro in South Sudan, an interview with Emmanuel Baron, executive director of Epicentre, and photos from MSF's trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

  • This special "Year in Pictures" issue brings you images from MSF's activities all over the world in 2011. These photos chronicle the response to the humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa; ongoing programs in conflict-affected areas of Afghanistan, Ivory Coast, Libya, and others; the birth of South Sudan, the world's newest nation; MSF's continuing work in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and more. Also read a new Field Journal from an MSF nurse who spent 14 months in Haiti providing care in the aftermath of the earthquake.

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Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) frequently publishes updates, press releases, and other forms of communication about its work in more than 60 countries around the world. See the list below for the most recent updates or search by location, topic, or year.

Country/Region

March 16, 2016

Pregnancy 

Ebola viral disease and pregnancy

During past Ebola outbreaks the chances that a pregnant women would survive the disease were nearly zero, according to the very limited data available. Moreover, clinical management of these women brought ethical challenges for medical staff, including fears of infection due to the large amount of infectious body fluids at delivery.

March 16, 2016

More than 400 war-wounded people, many of them civilians, have arrived at hospitals supported by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Taiz, Yemen, over the past week as intense fighting continues in the city. MSF warns that urban warfare in densely populated areas is having devastating consequences for civilians trapped between front lines.

March 16, 2016

SANAA/BARCELONA, MARCH 16, 2016—Medical teams working for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Abs Hospital, Yemen, treated more than 40 patients injured in two deadly airstrikes on a marketplace in Khamis village, Mustaba District, northern Hajja Governorate March 15. Two people died in transit to the hospital, and four patients arrived in critical condition, including an eight-year-old child who was referred to a specialist for neurosurgical care.

March 16, 2016

JUBA—The people of Leer, South Sudan, continue to live in fear, with at least four incidents of rape, looting, and violence recorded this month alone.

In the most recent incident on March 14, 27 civilians—mostly women and children—fled to the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) compound seeking shelter as their houses were looted by a group of men carrying guns.

Bahar was granted refugee status in Denmark.
March 14, 2016

Bahar, a refugee from Syria, worked with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) for three years in Iraq’s Domiz refugee camp before making the hard decision to leave for Europe. Hidden in a coffin-like box, and surviving on dates, she was smuggled as far as the Danish border.

March 14, 2016

Suar left military service in Syria and made a run for Iraqi Kurdistan, a journey that involved people smugglers, minefields, and the loss of his most precious possessions. Now settled in Iraq's Domiz refugee camp, where he works for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a nurse, Suar is upbeat about the opportunities afforded him by life as a refugee.

March 14, 2016

For the past four years, 59-year-old Najah has lived with her son Ahmad in Al Minieh, northern Lebanon. Sometimes she finds it lonely being away from her home in Syria, being a refugee. She can’t get used to not having her eight other children nearby, her 13 grandchildren playing around her feet, and the whole family sitting down together at mealtimes.

Now, Najah’s children and grandchildren are dispersed across seven countries and three continents – from Syria to Turkey, Iraq, Austria, the Netherlands, and Australia – while she dreams of the day when they will all meet up again.

March 14, 2016

Ahmed, a 26-year-old Syrian, is the manager of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) pharmacy in Kilis, Turkey. He currently works on MSF´s donation program, which provides drugs and medical supplies to more than 15 hospitals and health centers inside Syria and distributes essential household goods to internally displaced people caught up in the conflict.

Ahmed, who crosses the border into Syria daily, is constantly confronted with the distress of those trying to flee the war-torn country. Here he describes the situation.

March 14, 2016

Five years after it first broke out, the deadly conflict in Syria has had a disastrous impact on the country's population. Many have been forced to flee their homes to escape daily bombings and violence. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that more than four million Syrians have left their country since fighting began in 2011. The majority of them now live in refugee camps or informal settlements in the neighboring countries of Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, and Turkey.

March 11, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) started treating hepatitis C in Karachi, Pakistan's Machar Colony slum not just because of the area's poor health system, but also because many people there couldn't otherwise afford testing and treatment. By providing care at a primary health care clinic, patients can access free diagnosis and quality treatment without having to travel to a hospital, a journey that for many is prohibitively expensive. The current project is a pilot to show that this model of decentralized care can be effective.

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