Country/Region

November 30, 2015

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Despite considerable investments in supply chain reforms, wide-spread medicines stock outs negatively constrain patients’ ability to have access to their medication. Limited availability of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) caused by dysfunctional supply chains impedes patient initiation and adherence and poses a major barrier to win the global fight against HIV.

A Q&A session with Maryline Mulemba, MSF Head of Mission in Malawi and Testimonies from Antiretrovial Program Patients

 

Six months after Haiti’s January 12 earthquake, MSF describes the organization’s largest ever emergency response.

Six months after Haiti’s January 12 earthquake, MSF describes the organization’s largest ever emergency response.

One year after a devastating earthquake, Haitians continue to endure appalling living conditions amid a nationwide cholera outbreak, despite the largest humanitarian aid deployment in the world.

By the end of 2010, MSF has estimated it will have spent all of the $138 million donated by private supporters for Haiti. 

MSF had already been present and active in Haiti for the past 19 years. It was therefore ready to respond when the disaster struck. And it is now prepared to do the work that will remain in the days, months, and years to come.

A decade after MSF started treating people living with HIV in Malawi's Chiradzulu district, it's clear that ARVs and proper care prolong life, prevent new transmissions, and allow people to regain their autonomy.

While gains made in the fight against HIV/AIDS in the past decade are encouraging, countries most affected by the pandemic continue to struggle to place enough people on treatment and implement the best science and strategies to fight the disease.