Country/Region

December 18, 2014

Typhoon Haiyan, or Yolanda as it is known locally, the strongest typhoon ever recorded at landfall, ripped through the central Philippines on November 8, 2013. It caused devastation on an unprecedented scale—roofs were ripped off, villages were flattened, livelihoods were swept away, and a tsunami-like storm surge claimed more than 6,300 lives and displaced some four million people.*

May 08, 2014

This special report details MSF's activities in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, which ripped through the central Philippines on November 8, 2013, causing a disaster of unprecedented proportions.

Part I: From the MSF Medical Team in Bahr El Gazal, June 1998

"One child who doesn't die is one child who survives." — Karine Coudert, French nutritionist

Ajiep, June 1, 1998

The following are testimonies collected by Samantha Bolton, Press Officer for Doctors Without Borders, during her visits to the organization's feeding centers in southern Sudan in early August. Text in italics is her commentary.

More than three years after the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in January 2005, medical needs remain critical, and simmering tensions create a precarious security situation. This report focuses on the areas of Greater Upper Nile, including Unity, northern Jonglei and Upper Nile States. Although extrapolations to other areas must be done with caution, the health situation in Greater Upper Nile can be considered representative of many of the war-devastated communities in southern Sudan.

Since early 2003, the people of Darfur have endured a vicious campaign of violence, which has forced almost 2 million people to flee from their destroyed villages in search of safety. Rape against women, children, and men has sadly been a constant factor in this violence throughout this campaign of terror. More tragically, it continues to this day even long after people have fled from their villages. The stories of rape survivors give a horrific illustration of the daily reality of people in Darfur and especially of women and young girls, the primary victims of this form of violence. It has to stop.

This year, MSF has witnessed a worrying deterioration in the situation in the semi-autonomous region of Southern Sudan, with severe medical humanitarian implications for the population.