MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

April 05, 2016

Waheedullah Sahel, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Kunduz staff member, walks through the destroyed hospital and describes the scene of the attack.

Read: What Was Lost In The Kunduz Hospital Attacks

 

 

March 31, 2016

Dr. Kathleen Thomas is an intensive care doctor from Australia who was on her first mission in Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan from May 2015 until the US airstrikes on October 3. Here she describes a typical day in the hospital and the events that unfolded during the week of intense fighting leading up to the attack.[1]

February 16, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treated more than 60 people on the morning of Monday, February 15, after a series of grenade explosions in several locations across Burundi's capital city of Bujumbura. This influx of wounded patients occurred just five days after two other grenade attacks wounded dozens of people, 55 of whom were treated at l’Arche, MSF’s trauma center in Bujumbura.

October 05, 2015

Opened in August 2011, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan, was the only facility of its kind in the region, providing free life- and limb-saving medical care to tens of thousands of people. In 2014, more than 22,000 patients received care at the hospital, and more than 5,900 surgeries were performed.

October 01, 2015

Dr. Masood Nasim leads the medical team at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan. Here, he describes the first 72 hours in the hospital after fighting engulfed Kunduz city on Monday.

September 15, 2015

The trauma center run by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Kunduz is the only facility to provide care to trauma victims in the northeast Afghanistan. This man is visiting his son who has a shrapnel wound to his leg.

September 15, 2015

Watch A Month in Focus, a monthly video series that reports on some of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) current field activities.

July 03, 2015

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) condemns the violent intrusion by armed members of Afghan Special Forces in the organization’s trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The incident is an unacceptable breach of International Humanitarian Law, which protects medical services from attacks.

May 16, 2012

Before the opening of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) surgical hospital in Kunduz Province, northern Afghanistan, people in the region suffering from severe injuries had two options. They made the long and dangerous journey to Kabul or Pakistan, or they visited an expensive private clinic. As a result, few patients received the trauma care they needed.

April 05, 2016

Waheedullah Sahel, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Kunduz staff member, walks through the destroyed hospital and describes the scene of the attack.

Read: What Was Lost In The Kunduz Hospital Attacks

 

 

March 31, 2016

Dr. Kathleen Thomas is an intensive care doctor from Australia who was on her first mission in Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan from May 2015 until the US airstrikes on October 3. Here she describes a typical day in the hospital and the events that unfolded during the week of intense fighting leading up to the attack.[1]

February 16, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treated more than 60 people on the morning of Monday, February 15, after a series of grenade explosions in several locations across Burundi's capital city of Bujumbura. This influx of wounded patients occurred just five days after two other grenade attacks wounded dozens of people, 55 of whom were treated at l’Arche, MSF’s trauma center in Bujumbura.

October 05, 2015

Opened in August 2011, the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan, was the only facility of its kind in the region, providing free life- and limb-saving medical care to tens of thousands of people. In 2014, more than 22,000 patients received care at the hospital, and more than 5,900 surgeries were performed.

October 01, 2015

Dr. Masood Nasim leads the medical team at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) trauma hospital in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan. Here, he describes the first 72 hours in the hospital after fighting engulfed Kunduz city on Monday.

September 15, 2015

The trauma center run by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Kunduz is the only facility to provide care to trauma victims in the northeast Afghanistan. This man is visiting his son who has a shrapnel wound to his leg.

September 15, 2015

Watch A Month in Focus, a monthly video series that reports on some of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) current field activities.

July 03, 2015

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) condemns the violent intrusion by armed members of Afghan Special Forces in the organization’s trauma center in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The incident is an unacceptable breach of International Humanitarian Law, which protects medical services from attacks.

May 16, 2012

Before the opening of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) surgical hospital in Kunduz Province, northern Afghanistan, people in the region suffering from severe injuries had two options. They made the long and dangerous journey to Kabul or Pakistan, or they visited an expensive private clinic. As a result, few patients received the trauma care they needed.