MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Country/Region

February 14, 2017

NEW YORK/NEW DELHI, FEBRUARY 14, 2017—Five new challenges against flawed patents on crucial new medicines to treat hepatitis C filed in India and Argentina are the latest in a global push to ensure access to affordable treatment. The patent challenges could remove barriers to production and distribution of affordable generic versions of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medicines, including sofosbuvir, daclatasvir and velpatasvir, and increase access for millions of people.

July 22, 2016

"Libya is a very dangerous place. There are a lot of armed people. People are killed and kidnappings are common. Arriving in Tripoli, we were locked in a house with 600 to 700 other people. We had no water to wash ourselves, we had very little food, and we were forced to sleep on top of each other. It was very difficult for my daughter—she fell sick many times. There was a lot of violence. I was beaten with bare hands, with sticks, and with guns. If you move, they beat you. If you talk, they beat you. We spent months like that, being beaten every day."

February 14, 2017

NEW YORK/NEW DELHI, FEBRUARY 14, 2017—Five new challenges against flawed patents on crucial new medicines to treat hepatitis C filed in India and Argentina are the latest in a global push to ensure access to affordable treatment. The patent challenges could remove barriers to production and distribution of affordable generic versions of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medicines, including sofosbuvir, daclatasvir and velpatasvir, and increase access for millions of people.

July 22, 2016

"Libya is a very dangerous place. There are a lot of armed people. People are killed and kidnappings are common. Arriving in Tripoli, we were locked in a house with 600 to 700 other people. We had no water to wash ourselves, we had very little food, and we were forced to sleep on top of each other. It was very difficult for my daughter—she fell sick many times. There was a lot of violence. I was beaten with bare hands, with sticks, and with guns. If you move, they beat you. If you talk, they beat you. We spent months like that, being beaten every day."