MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

September 01, 2016

Dutch photojournalist, Kadir Van Lohuizen, recently visited the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) 300 bed hospital in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

April 05, 2016

Waheedullah Sahel, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Kunduz staff member, walks through the destroyed hospital and describes the scene of the attack.

Read: What Was Lost In The Kunduz Hospital Attacks

 

 

April 01, 2016

At a meeting of Kunduz community elders in the hospital, a representative talks about the importance of the hospital to the people of Kunduz, and the difficulty they now face to access health care.

April 01, 2016

Three-year-old Shaista was injured when a bomb hit her house. She was admitted to the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital, and two days later was the only patient in the intensive care unit to survive the attack. Her parents describe how they had to sell their belongings to be able to travel to Pakistan for her treatment, because there is no longer free trauma care available in Kunduz.

April 01, 2016

Dr. Evangeline Cua is a surgeon from the Philippines in Doctors Without Borders'/Médecins Sans Frontières' (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan when US airstrikes destroyed the hospital on October 3. Here she shares her story of surviving that horrific night.

PART 1

It happened again last night.

March 31, 2016

Dr. Kathleen Thomas is an intensive care doctor from Australia who was on her first mission in Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan from May 2015 until the US airstrikes on October 3. Here she describes a typical day in the hospital and the events that unfolded during the week of intense fighting leading up to the attack.[1]

December 09, 2015

WASHINGTON, D.C., DECEMBER 9, 2015 — The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today delivered a petition signed by more than 547,000 people to the White House, calling for President Obama to consent to an independent investigation of the deadly U.S. airstrikes on MSF's trauma hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

October 15, 2015

U.S. Urged to Consent to International Inquiry Into Devastating Airstrikes on MSF Hospital in Kunduz

NEW YORK — The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today launched a petition urging citizens to call on President Obama and the United States to consent to an independent investigation into the bombing of MSF’s trauma hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, on October 3.

October 06, 2015

Statement by Dr Joanne Liu, President, MSF International

For four years, the MSF trauma center in Kunduz was the only facility of its kind in northeastern Afghanistan, offering essential medical and surgical care. On Saturday, October 3, this came to an end when the hospital was deliberately bombed. Twelve MSF staff and 10 patients, including three children, were killed, and 37 people were injured, including 19 members of the MSF team. The attack was unacceptable.

September 15, 2015

The trauma center run by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Kunduz is the only facility to provide care to trauma victims in the northeast Afghanistan. This man is visiting his son who has a shrapnel wound to his leg.

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September 01, 2016

Dutch photojournalist, Kadir Van Lohuizen, recently visited the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) 300 bed hospital in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

April 05, 2016

Waheedullah Sahel, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Kunduz staff member, walks through the destroyed hospital and describes the scene of the attack.

Read: What Was Lost In The Kunduz Hospital Attacks

 

 

April 01, 2016

At a meeting of Kunduz community elders in the hospital, a representative talks about the importance of the hospital to the people of Kunduz, and the difficulty they now face to access health care.

April 01, 2016

Three-year-old Shaista was injured when a bomb hit her house. She was admitted to the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital, and two days later was the only patient in the intensive care unit to survive the attack. Her parents describe how they had to sell their belongings to be able to travel to Pakistan for her treatment, because there is no longer free trauma care available in Kunduz.

April 01, 2016

Dr. Evangeline Cua is a surgeon from the Philippines in Doctors Without Borders'/Médecins Sans Frontières' (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan when US airstrikes destroyed the hospital on October 3. Here she shares her story of surviving that horrific night.

PART 1

It happened again last night.

March 31, 2016

Dr. Kathleen Thomas is an intensive care doctor from Australia who was on her first mission in Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan from May 2015 until the US airstrikes on October 3. Here she describes a typical day in the hospital and the events that unfolded during the week of intense fighting leading up to the attack.[1]

December 09, 2015

WASHINGTON, D.C., DECEMBER 9, 2015 — The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today delivered a petition signed by more than 547,000 people to the White House, calling for President Obama to consent to an independent investigation of the deadly U.S. airstrikes on MSF's trauma hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan.

October 15, 2015

U.S. Urged to Consent to International Inquiry Into Devastating Airstrikes on MSF Hospital in Kunduz

NEW YORK — The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) today launched a petition urging citizens to call on President Obama and the United States to consent to an independent investigation into the bombing of MSF’s trauma hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, on October 3.

October 06, 2015

Statement by Dr Joanne Liu, President, MSF International

For four years, the MSF trauma center in Kunduz was the only facility of its kind in northeastern Afghanistan, offering essential medical and surgical care. On Saturday, October 3, this came to an end when the hospital was deliberately bombed. Twelve MSF staff and 10 patients, including three children, were killed, and 37 people were injured, including 19 members of the MSF team. The attack was unacceptable.

September 15, 2015

The trauma center run by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Kunduz is the only facility to provide care to trauma victims in the northeast Afghanistan. This man is visiting his son who has a shrapnel wound to his leg.

Pages