MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Country/Region

Topic

September 14, 2017

After 14 years in Kurram district, in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), Pakistan, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is withdrawing from the area. Without providing any explanation, authorities have refused to issue a No Objection Certificate (NOC). With no valid NOC, MSF cannot continue medical activities in Kurram Agency.

February 17, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Infectious Diseases Advisor Rupa Kanapathipillai answers questions about how MSF sees the global threat of antibiotic resistance at its projects around the world.

What does antibiotic resistance look like in MSF’s field projects?

I’ll give you an example. MSF runs a reconstructive surgical program in Amman, Jordan, for patients from neighboring countries—Iraq, Syria, and Yemen. They’ve often had multiple surgeries and have received courses of various antibiotics before coming to us.

January 09, 2017

Thousands of migrants and refugees are trapped in freezing conditions in Greece and Serbia without adequate shelter, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said today, calling again on the authorities to improve conditions for people suffering in below-freezing temperatures.

July 07, 2016

In 2011, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) opened a hospital dedicated to providing care to women living in rural areas in northeastern Pakistan. On May 18, 2016, Peshawar Women’s Hospital marked its fifth anniversary. Today, the hospital admits around 85 patients every week and safely delivers more than 4,700 babies each year.

April 05, 2016

Omer from Pakistan gives a terrible account of how refugees are treated in Turkey and how now he has been held in a detention center on Samos, Greece.

March 11, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) started treating hepatitis C in Karachi, Pakistan's Machar Colony slum not just because of the area's poor health system, but also because many people there couldn't otherwise afford testing and treatment. By providing care at a primary health care clinic, patients can access free diagnosis and quality treatment without having to travel to a hospital, a journey that for many is prohibitively expensive. The current project is a pilot to show that this model of decentralized care can be effective.

March 10, 2016

With up to 5 percent of its population infected, Pakistan has the second highest prevalence of hepatitis C in the world, just after Egypt. People struggle to get diagnosed and access treatment because of high costs and the fact that care is centralized in hospitals, rather than at their local health centers. The disease is an especially big problem in mega-cities like Karachi, where up to one million people are potentially infected.

Pages

September 14, 2017

After 14 years in Kurram district, in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), Pakistan, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is withdrawing from the area. Without providing any explanation, authorities have refused to issue a No Objection Certificate (NOC). With no valid NOC, MSF cannot continue medical activities in Kurram Agency.

February 17, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Infectious Diseases Advisor Rupa Kanapathipillai answers questions about how MSF sees the global threat of antibiotic resistance at its projects around the world.

What does antibiotic resistance look like in MSF’s field projects?

I’ll give you an example. MSF runs a reconstructive surgical program in Amman, Jordan, for patients from neighboring countries—Iraq, Syria, and Yemen. They’ve often had multiple surgeries and have received courses of various antibiotics before coming to us.

January 09, 2017

Thousands of migrants and refugees are trapped in freezing conditions in Greece and Serbia without adequate shelter, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said today, calling again on the authorities to improve conditions for people suffering in below-freezing temperatures.

July 07, 2016

In 2011, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) opened a hospital dedicated to providing care to women living in rural areas in northeastern Pakistan. On May 18, 2016, Peshawar Women’s Hospital marked its fifth anniversary. Today, the hospital admits around 85 patients every week and safely delivers more than 4,700 babies each year.

April 05, 2016

Omer from Pakistan gives a terrible account of how refugees are treated in Turkey and how now he has been held in a detention center on Samos, Greece.

March 11, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) started treating hepatitis C in Karachi, Pakistan's Machar Colony slum not just because of the area's poor health system, but also because many people there couldn't otherwise afford testing and treatment. By providing care at a primary health care clinic, patients can access free diagnosis and quality treatment without having to travel to a hospital, a journey that for many is prohibitively expensive. The current project is a pilot to show that this model of decentralized care can be effective.

March 10, 2016

With up to 5 percent of its population infected, Pakistan has the second highest prevalence of hepatitis C in the world, just after Egypt. People struggle to get diagnosed and access treatment because of high costs and the fact that care is centralized in hospitals, rather than at their local health centers. The disease is an especially big problem in mega-cities like Karachi, where up to one million people are potentially infected.

Pages