MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Country/Region

October 04, 2017

In 2017, nearly half of MSF's patients in Serbia were under 18; almost all of them were refugees and asylum-seekers who were traveling unaccompanied or became separated from their parents. Minors are supposed to be protected by the system, but many of these young people report violent abuse by European Union border authorities and police.

June 20, 2017

KAMPALA, UGANDA/NEW YORK, JUNE 20, 2017—Nearly one million South Sudanese refugees have fled to Uganda to escape the violence in their country, yet the international aid response is failing to meet their basic needs for food and water, raising the risk of a medical emergency, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said today, ahead of an international summit to raise funds for Uganda's refugee response.

South Sudan Uganda SGBV sexual and gender-based violence
June 19, 2017

Hundreds of thousands of people who fled intense violence in South Sudan now live in refugee settlements like Bidi Bidi and Imvepi in neighboring Uganda. Despite this massive influx, the international humanitarian response is still woefully insufficient, especially when it comes to treating survivors of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). Since March 2017, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has provided care for survivors of SGBV in Bidi Bidi and launched similar services in Imvepi in May.

May 18, 2017

"They just slaughter you, whether you're a man, woman, or child," says Maria. "I lost all my brothers and my relatives. Life here is very difficult."

South Sudan Uganda refugee
May 18, 2017

Nola Aniba Tito, 27, is a medical translator working in the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) health center in Ofua 3 Zone, in Uganda's Rhino refugee settlement. Originally from a town in South Sudan's Equatoria region, she fled violence in July 2016 with her children and started working with MSF in March 2017. Eighty-six percent of all South Sudanese refugees in Uganda are women and children. Here, she tells her story in her own words.

South Sudan Uganda refugee
May 18, 2017

Vanessa Cramond is a nurse from Auckland, New Zealand, who recently spent two months as emergency medical coordinator for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Uganda, where MSF is responding to an unprecedented influx of refugees from South Sudan. Here, she describes the situation. 

February 22, 2017

November 16, 2016

Services in Uganda are overwhelmed as tens of thousands of South Sudanese refugees stream across the border.

September 19, 2016

With winter starting to factor into people's thoughts, prospects seem grim for many of the migrants living in the notorious "Jungle" camp in Calais, in northern France. The French government has vowed to shut the camp down once and for all. Another barrier—a 13-foot-high, half-mile-long wall—appears set to go up. And just this week, Calais residents held demonstrations and set up roadblocks demanding that the camp be razed.

Even though assistance to the camp appears to have thinned, people are still making their way there.

Pages

October 04, 2017

In 2017, nearly half of MSF's patients in Serbia were under 18; almost all of them were refugees and asylum-seekers who were traveling unaccompanied or became separated from their parents. Minors are supposed to be protected by the system, but many of these young people report violent abuse by European Union border authorities and police.

June 20, 2017

KAMPALA, UGANDA/NEW YORK, JUNE 20, 2017—Nearly one million South Sudanese refugees have fled to Uganda to escape the violence in their country, yet the international aid response is failing to meet their basic needs for food and water, raising the risk of a medical emergency, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said today, ahead of an international summit to raise funds for Uganda's refugee response.

South Sudan Uganda SGBV sexual and gender-based violence
June 19, 2017

Hundreds of thousands of people who fled intense violence in South Sudan now live in refugee settlements like Bidi Bidi and Imvepi in neighboring Uganda. Despite this massive influx, the international humanitarian response is still woefully insufficient, especially when it comes to treating survivors of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). Since March 2017, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has provided care for survivors of SGBV in Bidi Bidi and launched similar services in Imvepi in May.

May 18, 2017

"They just slaughter you, whether you're a man, woman, or child," says Maria. "I lost all my brothers and my relatives. Life here is very difficult."

South Sudan Uganda refugee
May 18, 2017

Nola Aniba Tito, 27, is a medical translator working in the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) health center in Ofua 3 Zone, in Uganda's Rhino refugee settlement. Originally from a town in South Sudan's Equatoria region, she fled violence in July 2016 with her children and started working with MSF in March 2017. Eighty-six percent of all South Sudanese refugees in Uganda are women and children. Here, she tells her story in her own words.

South Sudan Uganda refugee
May 18, 2017

Vanessa Cramond is a nurse from Auckland, New Zealand, who recently spent two months as emergency medical coordinator for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Uganda, where MSF is responding to an unprecedented influx of refugees from South Sudan. Here, she describes the situation. 

February 22, 2017

November 16, 2016

Services in Uganda are overwhelmed as tens of thousands of South Sudanese refugees stream across the border.

September 19, 2016

With winter starting to factor into people's thoughts, prospects seem grim for many of the migrants living in the notorious "Jungle" camp in Calais, in northern France. The French government has vowed to shut the camp down once and for all. Another barrier—a 13-foot-high, half-mile-long wall—appears set to go up. And just this week, Calais residents held demonstrations and set up roadblocks demanding that the camp be razed.

Even though assistance to the camp appears to have thinned, people are still making their way there.

Pages