MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

September 19, 2016

2016 US Annual Report

September 22, 2015

2015 By the Numbers:

December 31, 2014

Dear friends,

We think it’s fair to say that 2014 was one of the most challenging years in the history of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), a year marked by uncommonly complex crises that demanded rapid, sustained, and effective responses on many different fronts.

January 01, 2013

 

Friends, at any given time, great numbers of people are on the move. It would be wonderful if they were all visiting family or conducting business or taking a holiday—if their journeys were their choice, that is. But we know that’s not the case.

December 26, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

Every year, our annual report provides us with the opportunity to explain to our supporters how we’ve allocated your generous donations and to give you details about the lifesaving programs Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is running in clinics, hospitals, and feeding centers all across the globe. In short, it gives us the opportunity to be accountable to the people who make our work possible.

In January 2010, hundreds of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) staffers were working in Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, when the city was hit by an earthquake that quickly took its place as one of the most devastating natural disasters in recent memory.

msf works in more than 60 countries across the globe, and in each, our job is to use the resources you have so generously entrusted us with—$133.9 million in 2009 alone—to establish structures in which patients can receive the care they need regardless of their race, religion, ethnicity, or affiliation. In 2009 we responded to numerous crises—conflicts, natural disasters, pandemics, and more—while advocating that humanitarian space be respected and that greater attention be paid to places and diseases too frequently neglected.

Your generosity to Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) during the 2008 economic downturn permitted us to continue our independent response to an extraordinary range and magnitude of emergencies. MSF-USA was able to commit more than $133 million to fund emergency medical programs in 2008— testament to the determination of supporters across the country to bring assistance and care to the most vulnerable people caught in crises in more than 60 countries.

the powerful will to save lives and alleviate the suffering of people affected by war, disease, and disaster is what brings together thousands of individuals from different nationalities, religions, cultures, and professions to work with doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans frontières (MSf). at the same time, the physicians, nurses, logisticians, and administrators running MSf’s medical humanitarian programs in nearly 60 countries around the world realize that their actions alone are rarely enough to truly improve the fate of their patients

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September 19, 2016

2016 US Annual Report

September 22, 2015

2015 By the Numbers:

December 31, 2014

Dear friends,

We think it’s fair to say that 2014 was one of the most challenging years in the history of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), a year marked by uncommonly complex crises that demanded rapid, sustained, and effective responses on many different fronts.

January 01, 2013

 

Friends, at any given time, great numbers of people are on the move. It would be wonderful if they were all visiting family or conducting business or taking a holiday—if their journeys were their choice, that is. But we know that’s not the case.

December 26, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

Every year, our annual report provides us with the opportunity to explain to our supporters how we’ve allocated your generous donations and to give you details about the lifesaving programs Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is running in clinics, hospitals, and feeding centers all across the globe. In short, it gives us the opportunity to be accountable to the people who make our work possible.

In January 2010, hundreds of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) staffers were working in Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, when the city was hit by an earthquake that quickly took its place as one of the most devastating natural disasters in recent memory.

msf works in more than 60 countries across the globe, and in each, our job is to use the resources you have so generously entrusted us with—$133.9 million in 2009 alone—to establish structures in which patients can receive the care they need regardless of their race, religion, ethnicity, or affiliation. In 2009 we responded to numerous crises—conflicts, natural disasters, pandemics, and more—while advocating that humanitarian space be respected and that greater attention be paid to places and diseases too frequently neglected.

Your generosity to Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) during the 2008 economic downturn permitted us to continue our independent response to an extraordinary range and magnitude of emergencies. MSF-USA was able to commit more than $133 million to fund emergency medical programs in 2008— testament to the determination of supporters across the country to bring assistance and care to the most vulnerable people caught in crises in more than 60 countries.

the powerful will to save lives and alleviate the suffering of people affected by war, disease, and disaster is what brings together thousands of individuals from different nationalities, religions, cultures, and professions to work with doctors Without Borders/ Médecins Sans frontières (MSf). at the same time, the physicians, nurses, logisticians, and administrators running MSf’s medical humanitarian programs in nearly 60 countries around the world realize that their actions alone are rarely enough to truly improve the fate of their patients

Pages