MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.



A survey of TB diagnostic and treatment practices in eight countries, October 2014.

MSF briefing paper, December 2014

What began in 2011 in Syria as protests inspired by the Arab Spring has become an entrenched and bloody conflict that shows no sign of resolution. Today, with an estimated 200,000 people killed and 7.6 million people displaced within the country and 3.2 million refugees registered outside, Syria is seen as the world’s most grave humanitarian disaster. In the face of this crisis, the previously functioning health system has collapsed and scores of thousands of medical staff have fled.

Iraq experienced a dramatic surge in violence in 2014 that triggered successive large-scale waves of displacement. More than 2.6 million people are said to have fled war-torn the central and northern areas of Iraq, particularly Al-Anbar, Ninawa, Salah Al-Din, Kirkuk and Diyala governorates.

June 19, 2015

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has learned that the Chinese patent office has just denied Gilead Science’s request for a key patent on the hepatitis C drug sofosbuvir. This drug, together with other antivirals, is the backbone of several newer, more effective curative treatments for hepatitis C, yet is exorbitantly priced in many countries, restricting access for people who need it. Hepatitis C is a global public health crisis, with at least 150 million people living with the disease, and 350,000-500,000 people die each year from complications of it.

June 29, 2011

Stories include: MSF teams treating wounded people in Misrata, Libya; the need for mental healthcare to survivors of Japan's tsunami; the new treatment target set by the United Nations to reach 15 million people living with HIV by 2015; and amendments to French law that suspend the ability of foreigners to get a temporary right of residence, which could create a public health risk.  

June 13, 2011

MSF will assist the construction of two temporary clinics in the tsunami-afflicted Miyagi and Iwate prefectures. 

May 09, 2011

Two months after the massive earthquake and tsunami hit northeast Japan, MSF psychologists are continuing to work with survivors.

April 15, 2011

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams are providing medical and psychological care to survivors of the earthquake and tsunami disaster that struck northeastern Japan on March 11, 2011. The national response to the disaster has been massive, so MSF is focussed on meeting the needs of small pockets of the population in remote areas.

All photos © Giulio Di Sturco/VII mentor

April 05, 2011

A team of six MSF psychologists have started working with the survivors of the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit northeast Japan on March 11.

March 24, 2011

While treating patients with chronic conditions in remote parts of the disaster zone, MSF is also supporting psychologists carrying out mental health consultations.

March 21, 2011

MSF is providing medical consultations in evacuation centers in Minami Sanriku, where some 10,000 people are housed in 20 locations.

March 19, 2011

The Japanese Red Cross has not asked for financial assistance, though other branches of the Red Cross and other relief agencies are collecting money targeted for the country. But Japan is not Haiti in that it is a rich country with a disaster relief infrastructure in place. Some are arguing that individuals should not donate their money specifically for Japan. Jennifer Tierney, US Director of Development, explains why MSF is not accepting restricted donations for Japan.

March 17, 2011

"We tried to respond very rapidly. What we have looked at right from the beginning is a very small team trying to be flexible, mobile, modular."