MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

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Country/Region

10.30.2014

A survey of TB diagnostic and treatment practices in eight countries, October 2014.

October 31, 2014

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) would like to submit the following written comments to the 2014 United States Trade Representative (USTR) Special 301 Out-of-Cycle Review of India’s intellectual property legal regime and policies.

September 26, 2014

As Indian prime minister Narendra Modi makes his first official visit to the US, MSF is urging the Indian government to resist US pressure to drop the use of public health safeguards in its intellectual property laws.

September 15, 2014

 

On September 15, Gilead Sciences is expected to announce agreements with a handful of Indian pharmaceutical manufacturers to produce and sell generic versions of two new Hepatitis C drugs—sofosbuvir and ledipasvir. Approximately 180 million people live with Hepatitis C today, with 350,000 people dying annually of the disease.

May 15, 2014

 

Although tuberculosis (TB) is preventable and curable, it is the second-biggest infectious disease killer behind HIV and claims nearly 1.3 million lives each year.

The spread of drug-resistant strains of the disease is increasingly recognized as a public health emergency. Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is an umbrella term that refers to tuberculosis strains which resist the drugs routinely used to treat conventional TB.

October 30, 2013

In the mountainous region of Nagaland, northeast India, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is working with local groups and health authorities to treat people with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), a form of the disease that does not respond to the two main drugs used to treat TB. The two-year regimen for treating DR-TB is extremely arduous and can cause patients to become blind or deaf and can cause organ failure. MSF is calling for better diagnosis and treatment for DR-TB. Support the Test Me, Treat Me DR-TB Manifesto. Sign now at http://msfaccess.org/TBmanifesto/.

October 10, 2013

Outgoing International President MSF Dr. Unni Karunakara is taking to the road on a bicycle to travel 5000 kilometers in India to spark dialogue on health, health care, and humanitarianism.

September 18, 2013

India is often called the “pharmacy of the developing world” because companies based there produce affordable generic versions of medicines that are used in developing countries across the globe. More than 80 percent of the antiretroviral medicines (ARVs) used by MSF in its HIV/AIDS programs, for example, come from India, as do 80 percent of the ARVs purchased with donor funds globally. MSF and other treatment providers also rely on quality Indian generics for malaria and tuberculosis treatments.

June 28, 2013

A House subcommittee held a hearing on international trade disputes with India. Most of the event was devoted to U.S. drug company Pfizer's complaints about Indian policies that have fostered the country's billion-dollar generics industry.

June 26, 2013

MSF testifies in Congress on India's right to keep lifesaving medicines affordable.

April 18, 2013

On April 1, 2013, a landmark ruling by India's Supreme Court ensured continued access to affordable HIV medication for the millions affected by this disease, including the 220,000 patients that Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treats with generic HIV/AIDS medication. This access has been under threat for the past seven years by pharmaceutical company Novartis, which challenged a section of India's Patents Act that prevented the practice of "evergreening," or extending the patent of an existing medicine by modifying it slightly. By extending patents, pharmaceutical companies prevent the manufacture of generic drugs. The ruling by India's Supreme Court is a victory for those fighting for access to affordable medicine—at least, for the time being.

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