MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

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To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Although Russian authorities have announced a cease-fire for a few hours a day in Grozny and the setting up of 'humanitarian corridors' to allow civilians to 'safely' leave zones and cities that are under attack, the latest information gathered by MSF from Chechen refugees in Georgia refutes the reality of these measures.

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Congo Republic: A Forgotten War Rages

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by Joelle Tanguy and Fiona Terry

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Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) was awarded the 1999 Nobel Peace Prize for its work with populations in danger. The following acceptance speech was delivered in Oslo, Norway on December 10, 1999, by Dr. James Orbinski, then president of the MSF International Council.

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The coherence and similarities of the witness accounts reveal the deportations from Kosovo as part of a systematic policy in which the modus operandi, participants, and objectives can only have been pre-planned. The crimes committed qualify as war crimes and crimes against humanity.

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Delivered by Joelle Tanguy, U.S. Executive Director, MSF, at a panel presentation during the Travers Conference Ethics and Post-Cold War Humanitarian Intervention of the University of California, Berkeley

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For the past 11 months, fighting between the government army or militias and rebel militias have resumed in Brazzaville, the capital of the Congo Republic. This fighting has generated massive and blind atrocities against civilian populations. The resulting widespread violence perpetrated by the parties at war affects the entire civilian population. Arbitrary executions, mutilations, rapes, and disappearances illustrate the arbitrary character of the violence perpetrated against the civilians.

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Angola’s civil war has ravaged the country and devastated its population for more than thirty years. After a brief interlude, the breakdown of the 1994 Lusaka Protocol reignited the war in December 1998. Civilians are once again experiencing a new bout of insecurity and suffering. What could be one of the richest countries on the African continent has become one of its most desolate and depressed.

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Assessment conducted by Epicentre at the request of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), in collaboration with the Institut Français de Veille Sanitaire

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