MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Through its Access Campaign, MSF has been closely following the developments in the world of access to medicines, vaccines, and diagnostics.

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MSF and Oxfam warn that vaccination programs for the developing world are facing an acute funding crisis.

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In this interview, Dr. Fournier describes why a global response to the H1N1 pandemic must in the short term focus not only on vaccination, but on reducing mortality worldwide by emphasizing the identification and treatment of the most severe cases; and argues why access to the vaccine in the future must be based on medical need, not purchasing power of wealthy countries.

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In a recent study, MSF and its research affiliate, Epicentre, showed how rapid, mass vaccinations can reduce the toll inflicted by measles epidemics in Africa. "The fact that the WHO does not promote vaccination campaigns during an epidemic only hinders an effective emergency response," said epidemiologist Rebecca Grais.

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Since February 2006, the Angolan capital of Luanda has been experiencing its worst ever cholera epidemic, with an average of 500 new cases per day. The outbreak has also rapidly spread to other areas; to date, 11 of Angola’s 18 provinces are reporting cases.

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Introduction

Bacterial meningitis (*) kills more than 170,000 people each year. Although sporadic cases are detected in developed countries, the vast majority of deaths and suffering happen in Africa. Epidemics regularly hit countries in the area referred to as the African meningitis belt, which stretches across the continent from Senegal to Ethiopia. The total population at risk in the countries affected is around 300 million.

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by Elena Dubrovskaya, a freelance journalist specializing in Central Asian affairs

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