MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

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In June 2009, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) released a report, No Refuge, Access Denied, which outlined the severe risks Zimbabweans took in order to cross the border, the dangerous conditions under which they lived once they reached South Africa, and their lackof access to health care.

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Transcript of a press teleconference on Zimbabwe's humanitarian crisis, which continues to rapidly deteriorate, causing appalling suffering. MSF's medical teams have now treated almost 45,000 people for cholera, and the crisis is far from over.

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Zimbabwe's political and economic breakdown has led to abysmal access to public healthcare; a collapsed infrastructure; a crushing HIV epidemic; political violence; food shortages and malnutrition; internal displacement and displacement to neighboring countries. Above, more than three million Zimbabweans have fled to South Africa, including these children taking refuge in a church in Johannesburg.

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Despite the fact that many Zimbabweans risk their lives to flee Zimbabwe, the South African government has historically characterised them as ‘voluntary economic migrants’ and aggressively deported them. Zimbabweans say they had little choice but to leave and thousands continue to cross the border every day, legally and illegally, as a matter of survival.

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While gains made in the fight against HIV/AIDS in the past decade are encouraging, countries most affected by the pandemic continue to struggle to place enough people on treatment and implement the best science and strategies to fight the disease.

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