MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Country/Region

Topic

November 14, 2016

The ongoing conflict between Boko Haram and the Nigerian military has had a devastating impact on the people on northeasterm Nigeria's Borno State. In several locations, people seeking safety from the violence are entirely dependent on outside aid, which is not reaching them. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) program coordinator Helle Poulsen-Dobbyns recently returned from Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State. Here, she explains MSF's response to malnutrition in the region.

November 11, 2016

A humanitarian tragedy is unfolding while the world watches and does nothing. Months of siege and the indiscriminate bombing by the Syrian government and its allies have left the population of eastern Aleppo in desperate straits and its health system in tatters.

November 11, 2016

Doctors in eastern Aleppo are working under extraordinarily difficult circumstances, including shortages of health staff, fuel, drugs, and medical supplies.

As they treat the wounded, their own hospitals are being hit by airstrikes. Each of the eight hospitals that were functioning before the siege has been hit, many of them multiple times, with 27 strikes on hospitals in just four months. But in almost every case, the damaged buildings were cleared of debris, patched up, and reopened within a matter of days.

November 10, 2016

Today is World Pneumonia Day. It's a somewhat abstract concept, associating a specific disease with a specific day, but the reality of pneumonia is very scary and dangerous, and possibly even deadly, for millions and millions of people around the globe.

Each year, pneumonia takes the lives of nearly one million children worldwide, often for want of a vaccine. There is in fact a vaccine to prevent it, something that's commonly administered to children in many western countries, but it’s too expensive for many countries to afford.

November 09, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tropical medicine advisor Dr. Estrella Lasry explains what malaria is, how it can be treated, and the main challenges in the fight to end the disease. 

November 09, 2016

After a significant decline of malaria cases over the last three years in Niger, there has been an alarming resurgence of the disease this summer. This has called into question the prevention efforts implemented since the last malaria peak in 2012.

November 08, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)  vaccinated 710,000 people against yellow fever in 11 days in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The organizations is saying "Thank you" to all the donors and supporters of the campaign who made this possible. A vaccination campaign on this scale comes with numerous logistical challenges, such as managing the movements of 65 vehicles in densely populated neighborhoods and ensuring that the cold chain remains effective in keeping the vaccines at the proper temperature.

November 07, 2016

In an attempt to break up the everyday routine for children undergoing tuberculosis treatment in Tajikistan, the MSF psychosocial team organizes celebration parties as part of MSF’s pediatric therapeutic play program.

November 07, 2016

Residents of besieged Eastern Aleppo have been told to leave their homes or face death. As they brace themselves for what comes next, Amal Abdullah recalls the day four years ago when she was told to leave the eastern Aleppo neighborhood she grew up in, and the damages she faced even after relocating to escape the dangers of war.

November 04, 2016

Crowds draw into the local schools and churches of little villages, nestled against lush forests. Mothers wait with their children, lined up on wooden benches. Everyone is quiet—surprisingly enough for a long line of people made up mostly of the under-6-years-old crowd. But the closer the children get to the nurses, the more their curiosity morphs into terror. 

The nurses have a process: open the mouth for the oral polio vaccine, prepare one leg for the pentavalent, the other one for the pneumonia vaccine, and, "Jab, jab." 

Pages

November 14, 2016

The ongoing conflict between Boko Haram and the Nigerian military has had a devastating impact on the people on northeasterm Nigeria's Borno State. In several locations, people seeking safety from the violence are entirely dependent on outside aid, which is not reaching them. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) program coordinator Helle Poulsen-Dobbyns recently returned from Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State. Here, she explains MSF's response to malnutrition in the region.

November 11, 2016

A humanitarian tragedy is unfolding while the world watches and does nothing. Months of siege and the indiscriminate bombing by the Syrian government and its allies have left the population of eastern Aleppo in desperate straits and its health system in tatters.

November 11, 2016

Doctors in eastern Aleppo are working under extraordinarily difficult circumstances, including shortages of health staff, fuel, drugs, and medical supplies.

As they treat the wounded, their own hospitals are being hit by airstrikes. Each of the eight hospitals that were functioning before the siege has been hit, many of them multiple times, with 27 strikes on hospitals in just four months. But in almost every case, the damaged buildings were cleared of debris, patched up, and reopened within a matter of days.

November 10, 2016

Today is World Pneumonia Day. It's a somewhat abstract concept, associating a specific disease with a specific day, but the reality of pneumonia is very scary and dangerous, and possibly even deadly, for millions and millions of people around the globe.

Each year, pneumonia takes the lives of nearly one million children worldwide, often for want of a vaccine. There is in fact a vaccine to prevent it, something that's commonly administered to children in many western countries, but it’s too expensive for many countries to afford.

November 09, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) tropical medicine advisor Dr. Estrella Lasry explains what malaria is, how it can be treated, and the main challenges in the fight to end the disease. 

November 09, 2016

After a significant decline of malaria cases over the last three years in Niger, there has been an alarming resurgence of the disease this summer. This has called into question the prevention efforts implemented since the last malaria peak in 2012.

November 08, 2016

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)  vaccinated 710,000 people against yellow fever in 11 days in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The organizations is saying "Thank you" to all the donors and supporters of the campaign who made this possible. A vaccination campaign on this scale comes with numerous logistical challenges, such as managing the movements of 65 vehicles in densely populated neighborhoods and ensuring that the cold chain remains effective in keeping the vaccines at the proper temperature.

November 07, 2016

In an attempt to break up the everyday routine for children undergoing tuberculosis treatment in Tajikistan, the MSF psychosocial team organizes celebration parties as part of MSF’s pediatric therapeutic play program.

November 07, 2016

Residents of besieged Eastern Aleppo have been told to leave their homes or face death. As they brace themselves for what comes next, Amal Abdullah recalls the day four years ago when she was told to leave the eastern Aleppo neighborhood she grew up in, and the damages she faced even after relocating to escape the dangers of war.

November 04, 2016

Crowds draw into the local schools and churches of little villages, nestled against lush forests. Mothers wait with their children, lined up on wooden benches. Everyone is quiet—surprisingly enough for a long line of people made up mostly of the under-6-years-old crowd. But the closer the children get to the nurses, the more their curiosity morphs into terror. 

The nurses have a process: open the mouth for the oral polio vaccine, prepare one leg for the pentavalent, the other one for the pneumonia vaccine, and, "Jab, jab." 

Pages