MSF's publications are an expression of our belief in the principle of témoignage, or bearing witness, and the belief that we are accountable to those we work for and with. Sharing news about our activities and reflecting on them, offering critiques when necessary, are therefore crucial aspects of our work.

View and download these publications below.

To view the U.S. Annual Reports or International Activity Reports, please visit the Annual Reports page.

Country/Region

March 18, 2016

Statement by Judit Rius Sanjuan, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF) US Access Campaign Manager and Legal Policy Adviser 

March 17, 2016

Civilians are under relentless attack in Syria’s five-year-old conflict, with 1.9 million people under siege, borders closed to refugees, and rampant bombings of medical facilities and heavily populated areas. MSF calls on permanent UN Security Council member states involved in the Syrian conflict—specifically France, Russia, the UK, and the US—to ensure that they and their allies abide by the resolutions they have passed to halt the carnage.

March 16, 2016

In theory, the headlines bring you the "biggest" and "most important" international stories of the day. One moment, it might be Syria. The next, it could be Afghanistan. Or Ebola. Maybe Yemen, or the latest natural disaster to strike a country. Every now and then—though not that often, if we’re being honest—it might be Central African Republic or South Sudan. Usually, they have their moment and then it’s on to the next place. That’s understandable, to an extent. It’s hard to keep up with everything, and some places do exert a greater hold on our collective attention.

March 16, 2016

Pregnancy 

Ebola viral disease and pregnancy

During past Ebola outbreaks the chances that a pregnant women would survive the disease were nearly zero, according to the very limited data available. Moreover, clinical management of these women brought ethical challenges for medical staff, including fears of infection due to the large amount of infectious body fluids at delivery.

March 16, 2016

More than 400 war-wounded people, many of them civilians, have arrived at hospitals supported by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Taiz, Yemen, over the past week as intense fighting continues in the city. MSF warns that urban warfare in densely populated areas is having devastating consequences for civilians trapped between front lines.

March 16, 2016

SANAA/BARCELONA, MARCH 16, 2016—Medical teams working for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Abs Hospital, Yemen, treated more than 40 patients injured in two deadly airstrikes on a marketplace in Khamis village, Mustaba District, northern Hajja Governorate March 15. Two people died in transit to the hospital, and four patients arrived in critical condition, including an eight-year-old child who was referred to a specialist for neurosurgical care.

March 16, 2016

JUBA—The people of Leer, South Sudan, continue to live in fear, with at least four incidents of rape, looting, and violence recorded this month alone.

In the most recent incident on March 14, 27 civilians—mostly women and children—fled to the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) compound seeking shelter as their houses were looted by a group of men carrying guns.

Bahar was granted refugee status in Denmark.
March 14, 2016

Bahar, a refugee from Syria, worked with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) for three years in Iraq’s Domiz refugee camp before making the hard decision to leave for Europe. Hidden in a coffin-like box, and surviving on dates, she was smuggled as far as the Danish border.

March 14, 2016

Suar left military service in Syria and made a run for Iraqi Kurdistan, a journey that involved people smugglers, minefields, and the loss of his most precious possessions. Now settled in Iraq's Domiz refugee camp, where he works for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) as a nurse, Suar is upbeat about the opportunities afforded him by life as a refugee.

March 14, 2016

For the past four years, 59-year-old Najah has lived with her son Ahmad in Al Minieh, northern Lebanon. Sometimes she finds it lonely being away from her home in Syria, being a refugee. She can’t get used to not having her eight other children nearby, her 13 grandchildren playing around her feet, and the whole family sitting down together at mealtimes.

Now, Najah’s children and grandchildren are dispersed across seven countries and three continents – from Syria to Turkey, Iraq, Austria, the Netherlands, and Australia – while she dreams of the day when they will all meet up again.

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