Read about first-hand accounts from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) aid workers and patients.

October 25, 2016

South Africa has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis (TB) and drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the world, with more than 20,000 people diagnosed with DR-TB in 2015. Yet the current DR-TB treatment regimen—which consists of a combination of multiple pills and daily injections—is only successful in about half of all people who receive it. New drugs such as delamanid offer the opportunity to provide more successful, tolerable treatment regimens to patients with few other options available.

August 06, 2015

In Uzbekistan’s Autonomous Republic of Karakalpakstan, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) runs a tuberculosis (TB) program in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, helping patients manage the side effects of their drug regimens and providing psychosocial support to improve treatment adherence. Here, MSF medical team leader Tetyana Pylypenko discusses MSF’s

July 25, 2014

 

Thirty-five-year-old Khanyi proudly holds her certificate, which reads “I got tested and cured of TB." A mother of two, Khanyi lives in Logoba, an overcrowded informal settlement in central Swaziland near the industrial town of Matsapha.

Three years ago, while taking care of her diabetic husband, who is also co-infected with HIV and tuberculosis (TB), Khanyi was herself diagnosed with TB.

February 19, 2014

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been treating prisoners and ex-prisoners for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in the Donetsk region of Ukraine since June 2012. In this interview, MSF Field Coordinator Paola Mermati, discusses the challenges faced by the MSF team—and by their patients.

How are these patients different from others?