Read about first-hand accounts from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) aid workers and patients.

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January 11, 2018

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began working in Sulaymaniyah, northern Iraq, after a massive influx of people displaced by violence elsewhere in the country arrived in the area in 2015. Initially, MSF teams provided water and sanitation services in the Arbat camp for displaced people, and later expanded the project to provide mental health services in Ashti camp and rehabilitation and staff support for the Sulaymaniyah emergency hospital. The project closed on November 30, 2017.

January 11, 2018

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) began working in Sulaymaniyah, northern Iraq, after a massive influx of people displaced by violence elsewhere in the country arrived in the area in 2015. Initially, MSF teams provided water and sanitation services in the Arbat camp for displaced people, and later expanded the project to provide mental health services in Ashti camp and rehabilitation and staff support for the Sulaymaniyah emergency hospital. The project closed on November 30, 2017.

December 11, 2017

Monia Khaled is the water and sanitation supervisor for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Yemen, where a recent escalation in fighting coupled with an ongoing blockade restricting vital supplies are taking a heavy toll on civilians. Here, she describes her experience.

November 28, 2017

Months after Mosul was retaken from the Islamic State group, the Iraqi city’s health system remains decimated. Most of Mosul’s hospitals and clinics were damaged in the fighting and there is a severe lack of essential medical equipment, supplies, and staff. From July to October, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams supported 2,532 admissions in the emergency room, 746 admissions in the inpatient department, and treated 159 malnourished children through inpatient and ambulatory feeding programs at Al Khansaa Pediatrics Teaching Hospital in eastern Mosul.

November 15, 2017

After a four-and-a-half–month offensive, the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) and an international coalition finally recaptured the city of Raqqa from the so-called Islamic State (IS). The widespread devastation in Raqqa attests to the intensity of the fighting and air strikes—and raises questions about the fate of the city’s residents, civilians who, from the start of the offensive, were trapped with no access to humanitarian aid. Here, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) head of emergency operations Natalie Roberts reflects on the situation.

November 07, 2017

For over a year the Greater Kasai region of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been wracked by waves of violence sparked by the killing of a local chief by Congolese armed forces in August 2016.

September 11, 2017

Recent attacks on Zemio, in southeast Central African Republic, have closed the hospital and forced the city’s population, including MSF staff members, to flee. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) medical coordinator Wil van Roekel describes the ramifications of the violence for patients, including on some 1,600 HIV patients who need daily medication to survive.

August 16, 2017

Despite the end of Colombia’s 50-year long conflict with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia–People’s Army (FARC–EP) in November 2016, violence continues to have serious consequences for people’s lives and health.

July 20, 2017

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) teams have treated more than 450 severely malnourished children in its hospital in Qayyarah, around 35 miles south of Mosul, since March. Manuel Lannaud, MSF’s head of mission in Iraq, describes the scale of the childhood malnutrition problem in this region and how MSF is addressing it.

July 10, 2017

Zahra Hussain

Mother of two malnourished children

I came here with my sick children and I could barely find transportation to get us here.

A kind person with a car helped us get to the hospital. My children are in rough shape. I have four more back in Buhaira, our village. Life there is hard. I am worried about them...

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