Read about first-hand accounts from Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) aid workers and patients.

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March 22, 2017

On February 19, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) opened a field trauma hospital with surgical capacity in a village to the south of Mosul. It is composed of two operating theaters, one intensive care unit, an emergency room, an in-patient ward, and other necessary support facilities.

December 21, 2016

After working with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Liberia at the tail end of the Ebola epidemic, Australian nurse Emma Parker spent almost six months at Al-Salam Hospital in Khamir, Yemen. Here she describes her experience working as head nurse. 

December 06, 2016

Al-Marj clinic is an MSF-supported medical site in East Ghouta, an area of besieged towns near Damascus. After suffering a series of tragedies, Dr. Abu Yasser*, a general practitioner and director of the medical department of the clinic, describes the newest challenge: no more ambulances.

Yesterday, Dec. 5, a strike hit near our clinic and destroyed our two ambulances and two other hospital cars. This is terrible because now we are worried about what we’ll do if injured people come in and we can’t refer them elsewhere.

November 29, 2016

War-torn Aleppo is no place to raise children, but Umm Leen has seven kids, and they’ve never left the besieged city. Here, Leen tells her story about delivering a child into a city under constant target.

October 10, 2016

“What is clear is that we have lost the capacity to help in any major way,” says MSF's head of mission for Syria projects. Only 35 doctors remain in east Aleppo and they are overwhelmed with needs.

September 09, 2016

MSF surgeon Hardik Vyas, otherwise known as “Tonny,” writes from MSF’s Ramtha emergency surgical project, in northern Jordan, just across the border from war-torn Syria.

June 02, 2016

Yahya Jarad is a nursing supervisor at MSF´s Al Salamah hospital, and a 2007 nursing graduate from Aleppo University. Last Friday, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)had to evacuate the patients of Al Salamah hospital and close the facility as front lines drew too close. An estimated 100,000 people are trapped in northern Syria’s Azaz district with battle lines approaching.

March 31, 2016

Dr. Kathleen Thomas is an intensive care doctor from Australia who was on her first mission in Doctors Without Borders’/Médecins Sans Frontières’ (MSF’s) Kunduz Trauma Center in Afghanistan from May 2015 until the US airstrikes on October 3. Here she describes a typical day in the hospital and the events that unfolded during the week of intense fighting leading up to the attack.[1]

October 30, 2015

In Yemen, the poorest country on the Arabian Peninsula, more than 1,300 people living with HIV/AIDS are receiving antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. Around half of them live in the capital, Sana’a. Ensuring that those who need treatment have access to their medicines is a critical challenge, especially with the outbreak of war in March 2015.

May 09, 2015

Along with the remaining population of Sa’ada, a Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) team in the city spent last night under intense bombing by the military coalition led by Saudi Arabia that is fighting in Yemen. On Friday night, the coalition had given an ultimatum to the population to leave the city and its surrounding areas, declaring that the entire northern province would become a military target [Read MSF's response to the ultimatum here].

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